built for life

savannah sachdev

We met Savannah on her 967th day of running every day.

Savannah Sachdev: Built For Life
Savannah Sachdev: Built For Life
  Savannah Sachdev is a London-based, sport and running influencer. As a woman on social media in 2024 there are naturally some questions: How much do I share of myself? How unfiltered can I be? How do I inspire? How can I remain authentic? On a wet day in February, on Hampstead Heath, we met Savannah, a woman who is profoundly and positively, unapologetically her.      For Savannah this was day 967 of running every day, for us we got to talk to someone who we believe is the personification of the Stanley values; positivity, transparency, determination, and community.  Running to get out of her head and into her body, Savannah continued to tell us that what she really aims to show her community is that “movement can just be a little bit of fun, it does not have to be that serious”. If you follow Savannah on Instagram, TikTok or YouTube you will know that the balance can sometimes consist of running 15km in the morning, finishing with a croissant in hand at a perfectly picturesque cafe somewhere around London. Consistency is different for everyone; you just need to show up and then keep showing up, however you can.     Savannah spoke to us about the community she is building whilst acknowledging that social media can be a scary place, especially knowing that what you are sharing has an impact. Regardless of the nearly 200,000 followers she has, she is committed to sharing content that talks about what our bodies can do instead of what our bodies look like whilst doing it.     “As women, we sometimes feel a need to act a particular role. I do not want to do that, and things seem to be okay. If we take the paths less trodden with confidence, things will...hopefully...be okay”   Savannah’s Indian heritage, naturally, plays a key role in her life and therefore the content shared with the world. Sometimes seeking permission to post her content, Savannah still hopes to bring an interesting perspective and aims to take the fear out of doing some of the things other women and women in her culture would traditionally not do.     There are so many important conversations happening in 2024 for Women, Savannah mentions key topics such as solo travel, sex, finances, diversity and representation. Conversations that, in the not-so-distant past, were considered taboo. “There is more diversity, not as much as we would like, but it is a start. The existence of me on social media proves that”.     Savannah reminisced with us about the goals she set for herself, and the achievements made in 2023. It’s safe to say that 2024 will be full of even more goals, achievements and an ever-increasing determination to reach each milestone (Figuratively and metaphorically). Maybe now, with all this said, you will consider joining Savannah for tomorrow's run.   
Savannah Sachdev: Built For Life
Savannah Sachdev: Built For Life
  Savannah Sachdev is a London-based, sport and running influencer. As a woman on social media in 2024 there are naturally some questions: How much do I share of myself? How unfiltered can I be? How do I inspire? How can I remain authentic? On a wet day in February, on Hampstead Heath, we met Savannah, a woman who is profoundly and positively, unapologetically her.      For Savannah this was day 967 of running every day, for us we got to talk to someone who we believe is the personification of the Stanley values; positivity, transparency, determination, and community.  Running to get out of her head and into her body, Savannah continued to tell us that what she really aims to show her community is that “movement can just be a little bit of fun, it does not have to be that serious”. If you follow Savannah on Instagram, TikTok or YouTube you will know that the balance can sometimes consist of running 15km in the morning, finishing with a croissant in hand at a perfectly picturesque cafe somewhere around London. Consistency is different for everyone; you just need to show up and then keep showing up, however you can.     Savannah spoke to us about the community she is building whilst acknowledging that social media can be a scary place, especially knowing that what you are sharing has an impact. Regardless of the nearly 200,000 followers she has, she is committed to sharing content that talks about what our bodies can do instead of what our bodies look like whilst doing it.     “As women, we sometimes feel a need to act a particular role. I do not want to do that, and things seem to be okay. If we take the paths less trodden with confidence, things will...hopefully...be okay”   Savannah’s Indian heritage, naturally, plays a key role in her life and therefore the content shared with the world. Sometimes seeking permission to post her content, Savannah still hopes to bring an interesting perspective and aims to take the fear out of doing some of the things other women and women in her culture would traditionally not do.     There are so many important conversations happening in 2024 for Women, Savannah mentions key topics such as solo travel, sex, finances, diversity and representation. Conversations that, in the not-so-distant past, were considered taboo. “There is more diversity, not as much as we would like, but it is a start. The existence of me on social media proves that”.     Savannah reminisced with us about the goals she set for herself, and the achievements made in 2023. It’s safe to say that 2024 will be full of even more goals, achievements and an ever-increasing determination to reach each milestone (Figuratively and metaphorically). Maybe now, with all this said, you will consider joining Savannah for tomorrow's run.   
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How To Prepare a Camp Cook Kit
How To Prepare a Camp Cook Kit
Tips for preparing the perfect Camp Cook Kit to help you get outside ready this season.  ENJOY MEMORABLE MEALS DURING YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTUREWhether you’re a traditional camper, a stargazer or waterfall chaser, clearly, there’s more than one way to camp. No matter your camping style, you’re going to get hungry – and thirsty – out there. Whether you are planning an overnight camp, a backyard camping experience with the family, or a glamping weekend getaway, Stanley Camping Cookware and gear is built for making high-quality tasty meals.All Cookware and gear essentials for your ultimate Camp Cook Kit.COOKThe Adventure Full Kitchen Base Camp Cook Set  is a perfect starting point for camp cooking because it has everything you need for making tasty meals for a group of 4 - and it packs up into a nice compact bundle for storing when done with use. When traveling with 2 or solo, check out our Adventure Stainless Steel Cook Set for Two.CHEERThere is nothing better than a hot cup of coffee first thing in the morning or a cold beer to wrap up an adventurous day, but it’s that much better when you are sitting lakeside at your campsite on a Summer morning. Whether your sipping your morning coffee, happy hour cocktail, mocktail or wine around the fire our mugs, pints and tumblers have you covered, sometimes literally with a press-fit lid. Keeping your favorite beverages hot or cold for hours.STOREWhether you bring your home-made meal to the campsite or you want to bring your camp-made meal on your outdoor adventures, our insulated Food Jars and Coolers have got your back. Keeping your food and beverages hot or cold for hours to enjoy wherever you are. Our Adventure Stainless Steel All-in-One Food Jar even has a separate compartment to keep your granola, nuts and seeds from getting soggy as well as an integrated spork. RECIPES 7 RECIPES TO MAKE WITH YOUR CAMP COOK KITOnce you've gathered all your Stanley camp cookware and gear, it's time to test it out with these camp recipes.
A person in a grey tank top drinking from a Stanley water bottle.
Guide to Staying Hydrated During Outdoor Activities
Staying hydrated is a key component to maintaining your overall health. Being properly hydrated helps your body in several ways, including regulating body temperature, preventing infections, improving sleep, delivering nutrients throughout the body, and boosting organ health. The importance of hydration also extends to your active performance. Hydration can help keep joints lubricated for ease of motion and prevent muscle fatigue, and decrease your risk of injury. How Much Water Do You Need to Stay Hydrated? According to health professionals, you should be drinking between 11.5 to 15.5 cups of water per day. You may have heard of the “eight cups a day” rule. While it can be suitable for some people, it generally doesn’t take into account exercise, overall health, pre-existing conditions, or weather changes that may require you to drink more water to stay hydrated. A decent rule-of-thumb is that you should drink water (or other hydrating liquids) whenever you feel thirsty. Light-colored urine is also an indicator of proper hydration, while dark-colored urine can indicate dehydration. Symptoms of Dehydration Most Europeans are chronically dehydrated. This could be because of factors like not drinking the right kinds of fluids, or not drinking enough for your body type, and misinterpretation of dehydration symptoms. Dehydration is often misinterpreted as hunger, as they share many of the same symptoms. Dehydration symptoms include: Fatigue; Light-headedness or mild headache; Dizziness; Tight or sunken skin; Dry mouth; Dark-colored urine. Some groups are more at risk for chronic dehydration. These groups include: Young children: Young children, including infants, are at a higher risk of dehydration because they are at a higher risk for frequent diarrhea, vomiting, and tend to lose more body fluids from high fevers. Depending on their age, young children may not be able to determine if they’re thirsty or get themselves a drink. As a parent, you can combat this by introducing drinks with electrolytes into their diet, such as Pedialyte, and keeping track of their fluid intake. Before introducing anything new into your infant’s diet, make sure you talk with your pediatrician. Seniors: Your body’s ability to reserve fluid, as well as your ability to acutely perceive thirst, declines as you get older. Seniors with mobility problems may also have a hard time getting water for themselves or using traditional cups. As a senior or caretaker of a senior, you can combat dehydration by increasing water intake and using drinking accessories like straws or spill-proof lids. People with chronic illnesses: Many chronic illnesses increase your risk of dehydration, such as diabetes, cancer, and kidney disease. Certain medications can have diuretic properties, which require the user to increase their water intake to make up for the loss of fluids. Being properly hydrated can also help with cell reparation, which can benefit people with a chronic illness. What Drinks to Consume When it comes to staying hydrated, some drinks are better than others. Below are a few of the best liquids for hydration, especially when embarking on outdoor activities or exercise. Water, Water, Water Water is the best thing that you can drink, both during and after exercise or activity. The human body is about 60% water, therefore water is easily processed when consumed. It helps the body in a variety of ways, including digestion, cell replication, hormone manufacturing, and regulation, as well as preventing dehydration and maintaining general health. Electrolytes Electrolytes conduct electricity when dissolved in water and are essential for many bodily functions. Consuming drinks with electrolytes is particularly helpful during and after intense exercise — especially when you’re sweating. Some electrolyte drinks can have added sugars and food dyes that you may want to be aware of, depending on your dietary preferences or food sensitivities. Consuming electrolytes may also be useful during intense illness, such as the flu, where you may be losing excessive amounts of bodily fluids due to high fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Fruits and vegetables are other good sources of electrolytes. Herbal Teas Tea is largely made of water, therefore non-caffeinated options, like herbal teas are a good choice for hydration. Herbal teas, including peppermint, chamomile, rosehip, and others, can have other health benefits on top of being hydrating. You can enjoy herbal tea hot or cold, and it can be a great substitute for less hydrating cold-weather beverages. What Drinks to Avoid While the myth that caffeinated beverages cause dehydration has been debunked, they still shouldn’t be your first choice when feeling dehydrated because of their other effects. Sugar crashes, feeling shaky or jittery, mild headaches, and nausea are all symptoms that can come from overindulging in the following beverages. Coffee Anything with high caffeine content, like coffee, produces a mild diuretic effect. While this doesn’t necessarily contribute to dehydration, caffeine overload can cause you to feel anxious, increase your heart rate, and induce headaches and fatigue. These aren’t ideal symptoms to manage when playing a sport, or doing any strenuous exercise. Energy Drinks Highly-caffeinated energy drinks can have much the same effect as too much caffeine. Additionally, research has shown that drinking energy drinks in excess can spike your blood sugar and create insulin tolerance. This can increase your chance of developing type two diabetes, which is a serious and lifelong condition. Soda Drinking soda every day can increase your risk of type two diabetes and heart disease by up to 26%. The increased sugars can cause a sugar crash before or during exercise, which can cause you to feel lightheaded, dizzy, weak, and even cause fainting. While these drinks won’t cause dehydration specifically, they tend to produce the opposite effect of more hydrating beverages, like water and herbal teas, when it comes to activity performance and general health management. Summer vs. Winter Hydration Staying hydrated in the winter is just as important as doing so in the summer. It can help you battle off cold and flu season, help keep your skin from cracking due to dry air and help your body regulate temperatures. Staying properly hydrated during winter activities, such as skiing, sledding, or ice skating, is still important to reduce the risk of injury and muscle fatigue. During winter, you can swap out your usual water bottle for a vacuum-insulated bottle so that you can easily bring warm beverages to your winter adventures. Why Am I Not Staying Hydrated? If you feel like you drink a fair amount of water, but are still experiencing dehydration symptoms, there could be multiple reasons. Not drinking enough water for your body weight, sweating without replenishing lost electrolytes, and drinking too much caffeine are all reasons you might not be feeling hydrated. You can counteract dehydration with a few mindful routines: Bring a water bottle: Getting into the habit of bringing a water bottle with you to all of your activities, including work, group activities, and other events can help you get in the habit of drinking more water. Insulated growlers or mugs are popular choices because they can keep your beverage hot or cold for hours. Track how much water you consume: There are several free apps that can help you do this, as well as water bottles designed with a specific number of markers to help you keep track of hydration. You can also start a routine around your daily activities, such as one glass of water an hour while you’re at work to help you keep track. Hydrate before, during, and after a workout: It’s just as important to be hydrated before a workout as it is during and after. Being properly hydrated before a workout allows you to decrease muscle fatigue and even see improvements in your stamina while staying hydrated during a workout allows you to replace vital fluids lost through sweat. Hydration after a workout can expedite the recovery process. Bring enough water: For family or group outings, especially those with kids or pets, plan ahead to make sure you’re bringing enough water for everyone. You should take into account not only how many people are coming, but also the types of activities you’ll be doing. Higher intensity activities likely mean elevated thirst for everyone. Being prepared with enough water for everyone is a great way to ensure that your outdoor trip is safe for you, your animals, and your group members. Click here to read our other How-To Guides.
How To Prepare a Camp Cook Kit
How To Prepare a Camp Cook Kit
Tips for preparing the perfect Camp Cook Kit to help you get outside ready this season.  ENJOY MEMORABLE MEALS DURING YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTUREWhether you’re a traditional camper, a stargazer or waterfall chaser, clearly, there’s more than one way to camp. No matter your camping style, you’re going to get hungry – and thirsty – out there. Whether you are planning an overnight camp, a backyard camping experience with the family, or a glamping weekend getaway, Stanley Camping Cookware and gear is built for making high-quality tasty meals.All Cookware and gear essentials for your ultimate Camp Cook Kit.COOKThe Adventure Full Kitchen Base Camp Cook Set  is a perfect starting point for camp cooking because it has everything you need for making tasty meals for a group of 4 - and it packs up into a nice compact bundle for storing when done with use. When traveling with 2 or solo, check out our Adventure Stainless Steel Cook Set for Two.CHEERThere is nothing better than a hot cup of coffee first thing in the morning or a cold beer to wrap up an adventurous day, but it’s that much better when you are sitting lakeside at your campsite on a Summer morning. Whether your sipping your morning coffee, happy hour cocktail, mocktail or wine around the fire our mugs, pints and tumblers have you covered, sometimes literally with a press-fit lid. Keeping your favorite beverages hot or cold for hours.STOREWhether you bring your home-made meal to the campsite or you want to bring your camp-made meal on your outdoor adventures, our insulated Food Jars and Coolers have got your back. Keeping your food and beverages hot or cold for hours to enjoy wherever you are. Our Adventure Stainless Steel All-in-One Food Jar even has a separate compartment to keep your granola, nuts and seeds from getting soggy as well as an integrated spork. RECIPES 7 RECIPES TO MAKE WITH YOUR CAMP COOK KITOnce you've gathered all your Stanley camp cookware and gear, it's time to test it out with these camp recipes.
A person in a grey tank top drinking from a Stanley water bottle.
Guide to Staying Hydrated During Outdoor Activities
Staying hydrated is a key component to maintaining your overall health. Being properly hydrated helps your body in several ways, including regulating body temperature, preventing infections, improving sleep, delivering nutrients throughout the body, and boosting organ health. The importance of hydration also extends to your active performance. Hydration can help keep joints lubricated for ease of motion and prevent muscle fatigue, and decrease your risk of injury. How Much Water Do You Need to Stay Hydrated? According to health professionals, you should be drinking between 11.5 to 15.5 cups of water per day. You may have heard of the “eight cups a day” rule. While it can be suitable for some people, it generally doesn’t take into account exercise, overall health, pre-existing conditions, or weather changes that may require you to drink more water to stay hydrated. A decent rule-of-thumb is that you should drink water (or other hydrating liquids) whenever you feel thirsty. Light-colored urine is also an indicator of proper hydration, while dark-colored urine can indicate dehydration. Symptoms of Dehydration Most Europeans are chronically dehydrated. This could be because of factors like not drinking the right kinds of fluids, or not drinking enough for your body type, and misinterpretation of dehydration symptoms. Dehydration is often misinterpreted as hunger, as they share many of the same symptoms. Dehydration symptoms include: Fatigue; Light-headedness or mild headache; Dizziness; Tight or sunken skin; Dry mouth; Dark-colored urine. Some groups are more at risk for chronic dehydration. These groups include: Young children: Young children, including infants, are at a higher risk of dehydration because they are at a higher risk for frequent diarrhea, vomiting, and tend to lose more body fluids from high fevers. Depending on their age, young children may not be able to determine if they’re thirsty or get themselves a drink. As a parent, you can combat this by introducing drinks with electrolytes into their diet, such as Pedialyte, and keeping track of their fluid intake. Before introducing anything new into your infant’s diet, make sure you talk with your pediatrician. Seniors: Your body’s ability to reserve fluid, as well as your ability to acutely perceive thirst, declines as you get older. Seniors with mobility problems may also have a hard time getting water for themselves or using traditional cups. As a senior or caretaker of a senior, you can combat dehydration by increasing water intake and using drinking accessories like straws or spill-proof lids. People with chronic illnesses: Many chronic illnesses increase your risk of dehydration, such as diabetes, cancer, and kidney disease. Certain medications can have diuretic properties, which require the user to increase their water intake to make up for the loss of fluids. Being properly hydrated can also help with cell reparation, which can benefit people with a chronic illness. What Drinks to Consume When it comes to staying hydrated, some drinks are better than others. Below are a few of the best liquids for hydration, especially when embarking on outdoor activities or exercise. Water, Water, Water Water is the best thing that you can drink, both during and after exercise or activity. The human body is about 60% water, therefore water is easily processed when consumed. It helps the body in a variety of ways, including digestion, cell replication, hormone manufacturing, and regulation, as well as preventing dehydration and maintaining general health. Electrolytes Electrolytes conduct electricity when dissolved in water and are essential for many bodily functions. Consuming drinks with electrolytes is particularly helpful during and after intense exercise — especially when you’re sweating. Some electrolyte drinks can have added sugars and food dyes that you may want to be aware of, depending on your dietary preferences or food sensitivities. Consuming electrolytes may also be useful during intense illness, such as the flu, where you may be losing excessive amounts of bodily fluids due to high fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Fruits and vegetables are other good sources of electrolytes. Herbal Teas Tea is largely made of water, therefore non-caffeinated options, like herbal teas are a good choice for hydration. Herbal teas, including peppermint, chamomile, rosehip, and others, can have other health benefits on top of being hydrating. You can enjoy herbal tea hot or cold, and it can be a great substitute for less hydrating cold-weather beverages. What Drinks to Avoid While the myth that caffeinated beverages cause dehydration has been debunked, they still shouldn’t be your first choice when feeling dehydrated because of their other effects. Sugar crashes, feeling shaky or jittery, mild headaches, and nausea are all symptoms that can come from overindulging in the following beverages. Coffee Anything with high caffeine content, like coffee, produces a mild diuretic effect. While this doesn’t necessarily contribute to dehydration, caffeine overload can cause you to feel anxious, increase your heart rate, and induce headaches and fatigue. These aren’t ideal symptoms to manage when playing a sport, or doing any strenuous exercise. Energy Drinks Highly-caffeinated energy drinks can have much the same effect as too much caffeine. Additionally, research has shown that drinking energy drinks in excess can spike your blood sugar and create insulin tolerance. This can increase your chance of developing type two diabetes, which is a serious and lifelong condition. Soda Drinking soda every day can increase your risk of type two diabetes and heart disease by up to 26%. The increased sugars can cause a sugar crash before or during exercise, which can cause you to feel lightheaded, dizzy, weak, and even cause fainting. While these drinks won’t cause dehydration specifically, they tend to produce the opposite effect of more hydrating beverages, like water and herbal teas, when it comes to activity performance and general health management. Summer vs. Winter Hydration Staying hydrated in the winter is just as important as doing so in the summer. It can help you battle off cold and flu season, help keep your skin from cracking due to dry air and help your body regulate temperatures. Staying properly hydrated during winter activities, such as skiing, sledding, or ice skating, is still important to reduce the risk of injury and muscle fatigue. During winter, you can swap out your usual water bottle for a vacuum-insulated bottle so that you can easily bring warm beverages to your winter adventures. Why Am I Not Staying Hydrated? If you feel like you drink a fair amount of water, but are still experiencing dehydration symptoms, there could be multiple reasons. Not drinking enough water for your body weight, sweating without replenishing lost electrolytes, and drinking too much caffeine are all reasons you might not be feeling hydrated. You can counteract dehydration with a few mindful routines: Bring a water bottle: Getting into the habit of bringing a water bottle with you to all of your activities, including work, group activities, and other events can help you get in the habit of drinking more water. Insulated growlers or mugs are popular choices because they can keep your beverage hot or cold for hours. Track how much water you consume: There are several free apps that can help you do this, as well as water bottles designed with a specific number of markers to help you keep track of hydration. You can also start a routine around your daily activities, such as one glass of water an hour while you’re at work to help you keep track. Hydrate before, during, and after a workout: It’s just as important to be hydrated before a workout as it is during and after. Being properly hydrated before a workout allows you to decrease muscle fatigue and even see improvements in your stamina while staying hydrated during a workout allows you to replace vital fluids lost through sweat. Hydration after a workout can expedite the recovery process. Bring enough water: For family or group outings, especially those with kids or pets, plan ahead to make sure you’re bringing enough water for everyone. You should take into account not only how many people are coming, but also the types of activities you’ll be doing. Higher intensity activities likely mean elevated thirst for everyone. Being prepared with enough water for everyone is a great way to ensure that your outdoor trip is safe for you, your animals, and your group members. Click here to read our other How-To Guides.
EXPLORE HOW-TO
Easy Camping Dinner Idea: Simple Campfire Jambalaya
Easy Camping Dinner Idea: Simple Campfire Jambalaya
There are not a lot of one-pot meals that feed a large crowd quite like Campfire Jambalaya. This traditional Creole dish is a fantastic blend of seafood, spicy sausage, rice, and flavor. But do not be intimidated, you can easily make this at the campsite with Stanley. WHAT IS EASY CAMPFIRE JAMBALAYA? Jambalaya is a dish from Louisiana that is a mix and match of delicious odds and ends from the kitchen. You first start with the proteins. For my Jambalaya recipe, I added chicken thighs, andouille sausage, prosciutto, and shrimp. While this is my favorite blending, you feel free to add what you like! Use chicken breast instead for less fat or leave out shrimp if you don’t like seafood. It is your call. The flavor will be the same! Next is the veggies. You can’t talk Jambalaya without the holy trinity: celery, bell peppers, and onions. This is where the base of the flavor really comes from. Make sure to get some high-quality veggies as this will make sure the flavor from start to finish is perfect. Up next is the liquids and seasonings. This includes: Tomatoes Chicken broth White wine Creole seasoning (I recommend finding a local creole seasoning blend so you can taste something from the community, but if you cannot find anything then your local grocery stores should have a great selection) Creole seasoning is spicy and earthy. It is fantastic on shrimp and chicken by itself! I also recommend getting some that do not have salt so you can add that in by yourself. Lastly, you have rice. Long grained white rice is a fantastic rice for the dish. Once you add that into the pot, get ready for a good time! Let's Get To Cookin’ The cooking is actually pretty straight forward. To not let the daunting ingredients list fool you into thinking this is difficult. First, you will brown the proteins (without the shrimp). Next, you brown the veggies. Then you add the liquids, seasonings, proteins, and rice. You let that simmer over the fire till the rice becomes tender. The only last part is adding the shrimp at the last 5 minutes. Once those are steamed you are ready to eat! Making Jambalaya At The Campsite Or At Home? This is a simple recipe to make at the campsite. If you are RV'ing or Car Camping, bring along the Base Camp Cook Set and build your fire. It is a fantastic dish to get the kids involved in prepping and watching you cook. If you are hiking or going for a picnic, then maybe cook at home and put it in one of our Food Jars. It will help to keep the food nice and warm while you are traveling! Either way, you cannot go wrong. Easy Campfire Jambalaya Recipe Cooking DetailsYields: 4-6 ServingsCook: 90 minutesPrep: 30 minutesEquipment: Stanley Camp Cook Set & Stanley Vacuum Crock Simple Campfire Jambalaya Ingredients: 2 Chicken Thighs, cubed 64 grams of Andouille sauces, sliced 32 grams of Prosciutto, sliced 227 grams of Shrimp, seasoned with Creole 1/2 Onion, diced 1 Green Bell Pepper, diced 4-5 Celery Stalks, diced 177 ml Tomato Paste 355 ml of Crushed Tomatoes 2 1/2 tbsp of Creole Seasoning 2 Bay Leaves 473 ml of Chicken Broth 118 ml cup of White Wine 192 grams of White Rice Chopped Parsley, to garnish Oil, as needed Instructions: Using a fire starter and some local wood, start your fire. Make fire a medium heat. Place your grill directly over the fire and preheat Stanley Skillet and Pot from the Stanley Camp Cook Set. Add oil to both pans first. Add chicken to pot and sausage + prosciutto to skillet. Let cook for 3-4 minutes until browned and fully cooked. Pull all meat off and set aside. Pull skillet off and place the pot back over the fire. Add to the pot the celery, bell peppers, and onion to brown. Stir frequently. Once browned, add tomato paste, crushed tomatoes, creole seasoning, bay leaves, chicken broth, white wine, white rice, and cooked meat. Stir, cover and let simmer over the fire until the rice is soft (about 1 hour). Make sure to stir occasionally to prevent burning on the bottom. Once done, open up and place seasoned shrimp on top. Cover and let cook until shrimp become white (about 3-4 minutes). Pull the pot off the fire, garnish with parsley and serve. Make sure to add leftovers into Stanley Vacuum Crock for later or for traveling.   ABOUT DEREK WOLF I am the cook & creator behind Over The Fire Cooking. I love traveling the world and being inspired by how fire, food, and people come together.    
Camping Breakfast Recipe: Chipotle Egg Skillet
Camping Breakfast Recipe: Chipotle Egg Skillet
Here is the truth: some of the best meals you have ever eaten have not been from an indoor kitchen. That is right! We love food when it is cooked outside. The fresh breeze on your face and the crackling of the campfire are the perfect ambiance for a great meal. So then what is the reason that we choose not to cook outside more? The answer, we don’t have the right equipment. Cooking outside is one of the most rewarding culinary experiences that you can have, and yet having the right equipment is one of the most overlooked parts of the cook. Most often you are looking for lightweight equipment that is both durable and easy to clean. You want multi-purpose cooking pieces that can help you make breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Well, the answer is here! You need the Stanley Base Camp Cook Set. My favorite dish to cook outside is breakfast. Nothing beats a skillet full of eggs and carbs over fire. I brought my new Stanley Base Camp Cook Set out to the lake for the weekend to test it out and see if it could handle my rugged cooking style. It definitely could. Firstly, it comes with tons of equipment that fit perfectly inside of a 3.7 qt pot. You have a skillet, utensils, spatulas, plates, bowls, dish rack, heat resistant trivet and a cutting board. This compact cooking maven is ready to handle all your over the campfire experiences. If you are going to test this bad boy out, then you need to try my new Chipotle Egg Skillet recipe below. This spicy and sweet skillet will fill you up with all the necessary calories to take on a day of adventure. Just make sure to pack your Stanley Base Camp Cook Set! CAMPING BREAKFAST RECIPE: CHIPOTLE EGG SKILLET Cooking Details Yields: 1-2 Servings Prep: 5 minutes Cook: 15 minutes Equipment: Stanley Base Camp Cook Set Chipotle Egg Skillet Ingredients 2 fresh eggs 128 grams of hash browns 64 grams of bacon (chopped) 3 tbsp. of butter 1 tbsp. of paprika 1 tbsp. of brown sugar 1/2 tbsp. of chipotle powder 1/2 tbsp. of sea salt Cilantro (Optional) Instructions Using charcoal or wood, safely create a fire for direct grilling. From your Stanley Base Camp Cook Set, pull out the skillet, spatula, and cover. Add skillet to fire and preheat for 2 minutes. Add butter to skillet and let melt. Once melted add hash browns and let cook for 3-4 minutes. Push hash browns to one side of skillet and add bacon to other side. Let bacon brown. After both bacon and hash browns have browned, add all seasonings above. Mix seasonings, hash browns, and bacon. Let cook for 2-3 more minutes. Create a hole in the middle of the skillet, add more butter if the pan is dry and crack your two eggs into the hole. Cover with lid and cook to your desired preference. Pull skillet off the fire, top with cilantro and serve! For more recipes by Derek Wolf, visit OverTheFireCooking.com. ABOUT DEREK WOLF I am the cook & creator behind Over The Fire Cooking. I love traveling the world and being inspired by how fire, food, and people come together.
3 Gourmet Shellfish Recipes To Prepare In The Great Outdoors
3 Gourmet Shellfish Recipes To Prepare In The Great Outdoors
When we think of outdoor cooking, it’s easy for things like hot dogs and canned beans to pop into our head. Sure, these meals put something in your belly, but they leave your taste buds craving for more. Just because you choose to trade your in your modern digs in for the beauty of the great outdoors, doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice on the quality of the food you eat. In fact, it’s a great opportunity to up your cooking game and try your hand at gourmet cooking. In episode two of Not Without Salt, blogger and cooking extraordinaire Ashley Rodriguez shared several recipes from her late-night shell fishing adventure in Olympia, Washington. After combing the beach for hours, Ashley gathered fresh ingredients such as oysters and clams, she packed them in her Adventure Cooler and headed up the beach. Here is where she created an outdoor kitchen, featuring the Adventure Base Camp Cook Set. Ashley worked her magic and created a fine menu of options, complete with a boozy beverage. Smoked Clam Carbonara While far from the classic this carbonara is quite possibly the most satisfying meal by the fire. Clams slowly steam and smoke by the fire scented with the residual bacon and garlic cooked in the same pan. Eggs and Parmesan miraculously submit into a creamy sauce with the help of a bit of heat the starchy water that the pasta cooked in. Finished with a bit of lemon for brightness, parsley for color and freshness and even more cheese - no explanation needed. Serving Size: 4 to 6 170 g pancetta or bacon cut into 1/2 -inch strips 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 450 g spaghetti or bucatini Sea salt 20 g Parmesan, grated, plus more to finish 3 large eggs 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus more to finish 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest, plus more to finish 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 450 g clams, scrubbed clean 32 g roughly chopped Italian parsley to finish Add enough water to fill a large dutch oven or stock pot up halfway then stir in enough salt to make the water taste of the sea. Bring this to a boil. While the water comes to a boil, crisp up the pancetta in a large skillet, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until golden and crisp, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the bacon and garlic to a plate. Add the clams to the same skillet the bacon and garlic cooked in. Set the pan over the coals for 1 minute while stirring to coat the clams in the residual grease. Set the pan off to the side of the coals yet still close to the fire. They’ll slowly start to open and take on some of that luscious smoke. Cook the pasta until al dente, about 10 to 12 minutes. In a large bowl stir together the Parmesan, eggs, and black pepper until thoroughly combined. Add the hot noodles directly to the egg mixture and stir well and quickly so as not to cook the eggs. Add a bit of the pasta water as needed to create a creamy sauce. To the pasta add the bacon, garlic, and clams then stir in the lemon zest and juice. Transfer the pasta to a serving platter then top with more grated Parmesan, lemon zest, black pepper, and Parsley. Raw Oysters With Lemony Dill Oil And Percornio It’s a bit intimidating preparing shellfish dishes for the people who have dedicated their lives to raising some of the best shellfish around. But I could not have been more pleased (and perhaps even a bit surprised) with how delicious this combination is. The stunning emerald oil pools in the oyster shell creating a sea of green along with the salty brine. A flurry of Pecorino adds a creamy richness that cuts through the acidity and brininess beautifully. Serving Size: 4 to 6 1 small bunch Dill, stemmed removed, torn 1 small garlic clove Zest of one lemon 59 ml olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Pecorino, finely grated 1 dozen oysters, raw, on the half shell. Add dill, garlic and lemon zest to a mortar and pestle or small food processor. Crush or process until finely chopped. Stir in the lemon juice then stream in olive oil. This oil can be made ahead and brought to the fire. Top each oyster with a teaspoon of the dill oil and grate pecorino over. Spicy Tequila Oyster Shooters Besides sitting near the warmth of the embers I can think of no better way to warm up after a midnight shellfish adventure. Served straight in the shell you can leave the space in your backpack you would have taken up to pack glassware for more tequila. Serving Size: Makes 8 oyster shooters 1 slice jalapeno 2 slices cucumber 5 mint leaves 30 ml tequila 1 lime, cut into wedges 8 oysters, shucked but kept in the shell Add the jalapeno, cucumber slices, and mint leaves to the bottom of a Stanley cocktail shaker. Gently muddle until the ingredients are lightly crushed and fragrant. Fill the shaker with ice, and add the tequila. Replace the lid then shake vigorously. Pour a little over each oyster then finish with a squeeze of lime. Serve straightaway.
Easy Camp Tacos Recipe: Make Any Day Taco Tuesday
Easy Camp Tacos Recipe: Make Any Day Taco Tuesday
Last weekend I got to take off with some friends on Sunday to go spend the evening on the Little North Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River in Idaho in a 1985 VW Westfalia. We hung out all afternoon, did some fly fishing with no luck, and found a little spot to settle about 15 miles up a windy dirt road along the river to make a meal and spend time with no distractions. Eating in the outdoors is something I really enjoy. I highly recommend making a meal outside and away from civilization once a week, it allows you slow down and enjoy everything as its happening without the distraction of your phone, work, and the general busyness of life. It wasn’t Taco Tuesday, but we still enjoyed an easy camp tacos recipe. When it comes to cooking while camping, it isn’t usually the most glamorous activity unless you have the right tools. Personally, I’ve had many nights of sausage over the fire with some s’ mores later on. Then there’s the back country. That’s an entirely different story. Those adventures usually consist of an MRE or another freeze-dried food equivalent. As of late, I’ve been more into camping with my family. The more I’ve gotten into car camping with my family, the more I’ve enjoyed actually cooking a real meal while in the woods. This form of camping may require a little more planning and extra space, but having outdoor meals with my loved ones makes it all worthwhile. Bonus points if it’s an easy camp tacos recipe. Before we get to the recipe, remember those essential tools I was talking about to make camp cooking a breeze? My Stanley cookware is a key player in that mix in making camp cooking super easy for my family and me. I always bring my Adventure Full Kitchen Base Camp Cook Set for any family camping trip. My favorite thing about this cook set is that it packs down so nicely. Inside of a 3.7 QT / 3.5 L steel pot, there are: 1 3-ply frying pan holds 32 OZ / .94 L 1 Cutting board 1 Spatula with extending handle 1 Serving spoon with extending handle 4 Plates (6 in / 15.2 cm diameter) 4 Bowls (22 OZ / .65 L) 4 Sporks 1 Dish drying rack 1 Trivet Oh, and did I mention that the lid to the pot is a vented lid, designed to be used as a strainer? Yep, the set is pretty damn fancy. Pro Tip: One thing I’ve noticed about the Stanley cookware is that char is definitely unavoidable. No matter how much oil I cook with I always end up with a little layer of black and a weathered pot/pan afterward. Now to me this is a non-issue, but in the woods cleaning them can be a bit tricky. I found that the best way to clean them on site was to run down to the river and toss some sand in the pot and run across it with a rock. This cleaned most everything off the surface and left minimal cleaning to do once I arrived back at home EASY CAMP TACOS RECIPE I’ve made all sorts of fun camping recipes with this gear but one of my go-to camping meals is a version of a taco. Tacos are a crowd pleaser and you can never go wrong with this simple, yet satisfying recipe. Ingredients: Ground meat of your choice Shredded lettuce Diced tomatoes Yellow onion Red Pepper Salsa Guacamole Tortillas (corn, flour, or you could even do a lettuce wrap to cut down on carbs) Taco Seasoning (This is an essential in my camp box along with salt, pepper, and hot sauce) Cooking oil Easy Camp Tacos Cooking Directions: Season your ground meat with the taco seasoning. Then, add a little cooking oil to your steel pot and cook the ground meat until it’s browned. Chop your onion and peppers and sauté in the frying pan. After sautéing the veggies and browning the ground beef, tossed everything in the pot. Use the frying pan to warm your tortillas (optional step, but who likes a cold tortilla?) In a warm tortilla, place a scoop of ground meat & veggies, and garnish with lettuce, tomatoes, and guacamole. Boom! Dinner is served. Now, get out there and make some food in the woods. You’ll thank me later. ABOUT GRAFTON I'm a #raddad, bicycle mechanic, photographer and lover of everything the Western US has to offer. You can find me on two wheels, skiing, or knee deep wading in the river. My hands are always greasy and I'll do whatever it takes to keep on playing in the dirt.
Easy Camping Dinner Idea: Simple Campfire Jambalaya
Easy Camping Dinner Idea: Simple Campfire Jambalaya
There are not a lot of one-pot meals that feed a large crowd quite like Campfire Jambalaya. This traditional Creole dish is a fantastic blend of seafood, spicy sausage, rice, and flavor. But do not be intimidated, you can easily make this at the campsite with Stanley. WHAT IS EASY CAMPFIRE JAMBALAYA? Jambalaya is a dish from Louisiana that is a mix and match of delicious odds and ends from the kitchen. You first start with the proteins. For my Jambalaya recipe, I added chicken thighs, andouille sausage, prosciutto, and shrimp. While this is my favorite blending, you feel free to add what you like! Use chicken breast instead for less fat or leave out shrimp if you don’t like seafood. It is your call. The flavor will be the same! Next is the veggies. You can’t talk Jambalaya without the holy trinity: celery, bell peppers, and onions. This is where the base of the flavor really comes from. Make sure to get some high-quality veggies as this will make sure the flavor from start to finish is perfect. Up next is the liquids and seasonings. This includes: Tomatoes Chicken broth White wine Creole seasoning (I recommend finding a local creole seasoning blend so you can taste something from the community, but if you cannot find anything then your local grocery stores should have a great selection) Creole seasoning is spicy and earthy. It is fantastic on shrimp and chicken by itself! I also recommend getting some that do not have salt so you can add that in by yourself. Lastly, you have rice. Long grained white rice is a fantastic rice for the dish. Once you add that into the pot, get ready for a good time! Let's Get To Cookin’ The cooking is actually pretty straight forward. To not let the daunting ingredients list fool you into thinking this is difficult. First, you will brown the proteins (without the shrimp). Next, you brown the veggies. Then you add the liquids, seasonings, proteins, and rice. You let that simmer over the fire till the rice becomes tender. The only last part is adding the shrimp at the last 5 minutes. Once those are steamed you are ready to eat! Making Jambalaya At The Campsite Or At Home? This is a simple recipe to make at the campsite. If you are RV'ing or Car Camping, bring along the Base Camp Cook Set and build your fire. It is a fantastic dish to get the kids involved in prepping and watching you cook. If you are hiking or going for a picnic, then maybe cook at home and put it in one of our Food Jars. It will help to keep the food nice and warm while you are traveling! Either way, you cannot go wrong. Easy Campfire Jambalaya Recipe Cooking DetailsYields: 4-6 ServingsCook: 90 minutesPrep: 30 minutesEquipment: Stanley Camp Cook Set & Stanley Vacuum Crock Simple Campfire Jambalaya Ingredients: 2 Chicken Thighs, cubed 64 grams of Andouille sauces, sliced 32 grams of Prosciutto, sliced 227 grams of Shrimp, seasoned with Creole 1/2 Onion, diced 1 Green Bell Pepper, diced 4-5 Celery Stalks, diced 177 ml Tomato Paste 355 ml of Crushed Tomatoes 2 1/2 tbsp of Creole Seasoning 2 Bay Leaves 473 ml of Chicken Broth 118 ml cup of White Wine 192 grams of White Rice Chopped Parsley, to garnish Oil, as needed Instructions: Using a fire starter and some local wood, start your fire. Make fire a medium heat. Place your grill directly over the fire and preheat Stanley Skillet and Pot from the Stanley Camp Cook Set. Add oil to both pans first. Add chicken to pot and sausage + prosciutto to skillet. Let cook for 3-4 minutes until browned and fully cooked. Pull all meat off and set aside. Pull skillet off and place the pot back over the fire. Add to the pot the celery, bell peppers, and onion to brown. Stir frequently. Once browned, add tomato paste, crushed tomatoes, creole seasoning, bay leaves, chicken broth, white wine, white rice, and cooked meat. Stir, cover and let simmer over the fire until the rice is soft (about 1 hour). Make sure to stir occasionally to prevent burning on the bottom. Once done, open up and place seasoned shrimp on top. Cover and let cook until shrimp become white (about 3-4 minutes). Pull the pot off the fire, garnish with parsley and serve. Make sure to add leftovers into Stanley Vacuum Crock for later or for traveling.   ABOUT DEREK WOLF I am the cook & creator behind Over The Fire Cooking. I love traveling the world and being inspired by how fire, food, and people come together.    
Camping Breakfast Recipe: Chipotle Egg Skillet
Camping Breakfast Recipe: Chipotle Egg Skillet
Here is the truth: some of the best meals you have ever eaten have not been from an indoor kitchen. That is right! We love food when it is cooked outside. The fresh breeze on your face and the crackling of the campfire are the perfect ambiance for a great meal. So then what is the reason that we choose not to cook outside more? The answer, we don’t have the right equipment. Cooking outside is one of the most rewarding culinary experiences that you can have, and yet having the right equipment is one of the most overlooked parts of the cook. Most often you are looking for lightweight equipment that is both durable and easy to clean. You want multi-purpose cooking pieces that can help you make breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Well, the answer is here! You need the Stanley Base Camp Cook Set. My favorite dish to cook outside is breakfast. Nothing beats a skillet full of eggs and carbs over fire. I brought my new Stanley Base Camp Cook Set out to the lake for the weekend to test it out and see if it could handle my rugged cooking style. It definitely could. Firstly, it comes with tons of equipment that fit perfectly inside of a 3.7 qt pot. You have a skillet, utensils, spatulas, plates, bowls, dish rack, heat resistant trivet and a cutting board. This compact cooking maven is ready to handle all your over the campfire experiences. If you are going to test this bad boy out, then you need to try my new Chipotle Egg Skillet recipe below. This spicy and sweet skillet will fill you up with all the necessary calories to take on a day of adventure. Just make sure to pack your Stanley Base Camp Cook Set! CAMPING BREAKFAST RECIPE: CHIPOTLE EGG SKILLET Cooking Details Yields: 1-2 Servings Prep: 5 minutes Cook: 15 minutes Equipment: Stanley Base Camp Cook Set Chipotle Egg Skillet Ingredients 2 fresh eggs 128 grams of hash browns 64 grams of bacon (chopped) 3 tbsp. of butter 1 tbsp. of paprika 1 tbsp. of brown sugar 1/2 tbsp. of chipotle powder 1/2 tbsp. of sea salt Cilantro (Optional) Instructions Using charcoal or wood, safely create a fire for direct grilling. From your Stanley Base Camp Cook Set, pull out the skillet, spatula, and cover. Add skillet to fire and preheat for 2 minutes. Add butter to skillet and let melt. Once melted add hash browns and let cook for 3-4 minutes. Push hash browns to one side of skillet and add bacon to other side. Let bacon brown. After both bacon and hash browns have browned, add all seasonings above. Mix seasonings, hash browns, and bacon. Let cook for 2-3 more minutes. Create a hole in the middle of the skillet, add more butter if the pan is dry and crack your two eggs into the hole. Cover with lid and cook to your desired preference. Pull skillet off the fire, top with cilantro and serve! For more recipes by Derek Wolf, visit OverTheFireCooking.com. ABOUT DEREK WOLF I am the cook & creator behind Over The Fire Cooking. I love traveling the world and being inspired by how fire, food, and people come together.
3 Gourmet Shellfish Recipes To Prepare In The Great Outdoors
3 Gourmet Shellfish Recipes To Prepare In The Great Outdoors
When we think of outdoor cooking, it’s easy for things like hot dogs and canned beans to pop into our head. Sure, these meals put something in your belly, but they leave your taste buds craving for more. Just because you choose to trade your in your modern digs in for the beauty of the great outdoors, doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice on the quality of the food you eat. In fact, it’s a great opportunity to up your cooking game and try your hand at gourmet cooking. In episode two of Not Without Salt, blogger and cooking extraordinaire Ashley Rodriguez shared several recipes from her late-night shell fishing adventure in Olympia, Washington. After combing the beach for hours, Ashley gathered fresh ingredients such as oysters and clams, she packed them in her Adventure Cooler and headed up the beach. Here is where she created an outdoor kitchen, featuring the Adventure Base Camp Cook Set. Ashley worked her magic and created a fine menu of options, complete with a boozy beverage. Smoked Clam Carbonara While far from the classic this carbonara is quite possibly the most satisfying meal by the fire. Clams slowly steam and smoke by the fire scented with the residual bacon and garlic cooked in the same pan. Eggs and Parmesan miraculously submit into a creamy sauce with the help of a bit of heat the starchy water that the pasta cooked in. Finished with a bit of lemon for brightness, parsley for color and freshness and even more cheese - no explanation needed. Serving Size: 4 to 6 170 g pancetta or bacon cut into 1/2 -inch strips 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 450 g spaghetti or bucatini Sea salt 20 g Parmesan, grated, plus more to finish 3 large eggs 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus more to finish 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest, plus more to finish 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 450 g clams, scrubbed clean 32 g roughly chopped Italian parsley to finish Add enough water to fill a large dutch oven or stock pot up halfway then stir in enough salt to make the water taste of the sea. Bring this to a boil. While the water comes to a boil, crisp up the pancetta in a large skillet, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until golden and crisp, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the bacon and garlic to a plate. Add the clams to the same skillet the bacon and garlic cooked in. Set the pan over the coals for 1 minute while stirring to coat the clams in the residual grease. Set the pan off to the side of the coals yet still close to the fire. They’ll slowly start to open and take on some of that luscious smoke. Cook the pasta until al dente, about 10 to 12 minutes. In a large bowl stir together the Parmesan, eggs, and black pepper until thoroughly combined. Add the hot noodles directly to the egg mixture and stir well and quickly so as not to cook the eggs. Add a bit of the pasta water as needed to create a creamy sauce. To the pasta add the bacon, garlic, and clams then stir in the lemon zest and juice. Transfer the pasta to a serving platter then top with more grated Parmesan, lemon zest, black pepper, and Parsley. Raw Oysters With Lemony Dill Oil And Percornio It’s a bit intimidating preparing shellfish dishes for the people who have dedicated their lives to raising some of the best shellfish around. But I could not have been more pleased (and perhaps even a bit surprised) with how delicious this combination is. The stunning emerald oil pools in the oyster shell creating a sea of green along with the salty brine. A flurry of Pecorino adds a creamy richness that cuts through the acidity and brininess beautifully. Serving Size: 4 to 6 1 small bunch Dill, stemmed removed, torn 1 small garlic clove Zest of one lemon 59 ml olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Pecorino, finely grated 1 dozen oysters, raw, on the half shell. Add dill, garlic and lemon zest to a mortar and pestle or small food processor. Crush or process until finely chopped. Stir in the lemon juice then stream in olive oil. This oil can be made ahead and brought to the fire. Top each oyster with a teaspoon of the dill oil and grate pecorino over. Spicy Tequila Oyster Shooters Besides sitting near the warmth of the embers I can think of no better way to warm up after a midnight shellfish adventure. Served straight in the shell you can leave the space in your backpack you would have taken up to pack glassware for more tequila. Serving Size: Makes 8 oyster shooters 1 slice jalapeno 2 slices cucumber 5 mint leaves 30 ml tequila 1 lime, cut into wedges 8 oysters, shucked but kept in the shell Add the jalapeno, cucumber slices, and mint leaves to the bottom of a Stanley cocktail shaker. Gently muddle until the ingredients are lightly crushed and fragrant. Fill the shaker with ice, and add the tequila. Replace the lid then shake vigorously. Pour a little over each oyster then finish with a squeeze of lime. Serve straightaway.
Easy Camp Tacos Recipe: Make Any Day Taco Tuesday
Easy Camp Tacos Recipe: Make Any Day Taco Tuesday
Last weekend I got to take off with some friends on Sunday to go spend the evening on the Little North Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River in Idaho in a 1985 VW Westfalia. We hung out all afternoon, did some fly fishing with no luck, and found a little spot to settle about 15 miles up a windy dirt road along the river to make a meal and spend time with no distractions. Eating in the outdoors is something I really enjoy. I highly recommend making a meal outside and away from civilization once a week, it allows you slow down and enjoy everything as its happening without the distraction of your phone, work, and the general busyness of life. It wasn’t Taco Tuesday, but we still enjoyed an easy camp tacos recipe. When it comes to cooking while camping, it isn’t usually the most glamorous activity unless you have the right tools. Personally, I’ve had many nights of sausage over the fire with some s’ mores later on. Then there’s the back country. That’s an entirely different story. Those adventures usually consist of an MRE or another freeze-dried food equivalent. As of late, I’ve been more into camping with my family. The more I’ve gotten into car camping with my family, the more I’ve enjoyed actually cooking a real meal while in the woods. This form of camping may require a little more planning and extra space, but having outdoor meals with my loved ones makes it all worthwhile. Bonus points if it’s an easy camp tacos recipe. Before we get to the recipe, remember those essential tools I was talking about to make camp cooking a breeze? My Stanley cookware is a key player in that mix in making camp cooking super easy for my family and me. I always bring my Adventure Full Kitchen Base Camp Cook Set for any family camping trip. My favorite thing about this cook set is that it packs down so nicely. Inside of a 3.7 QT / 3.5 L steel pot, there are: 1 3-ply frying pan holds 32 OZ / .94 L 1 Cutting board 1 Spatula with extending handle 1 Serving spoon with extending handle 4 Plates (6 in / 15.2 cm diameter) 4 Bowls (22 OZ / .65 L) 4 Sporks 1 Dish drying rack 1 Trivet Oh, and did I mention that the lid to the pot is a vented lid, designed to be used as a strainer? Yep, the set is pretty damn fancy. Pro Tip: One thing I’ve noticed about the Stanley cookware is that char is definitely unavoidable. No matter how much oil I cook with I always end up with a little layer of black and a weathered pot/pan afterward. Now to me this is a non-issue, but in the woods cleaning them can be a bit tricky. I found that the best way to clean them on site was to run down to the river and toss some sand in the pot and run across it with a rock. This cleaned most everything off the surface and left minimal cleaning to do once I arrived back at home EASY CAMP TACOS RECIPE I’ve made all sorts of fun camping recipes with this gear but one of my go-to camping meals is a version of a taco. Tacos are a crowd pleaser and you can never go wrong with this simple, yet satisfying recipe. Ingredients: Ground meat of your choice Shredded lettuce Diced tomatoes Yellow onion Red Pepper Salsa Guacamole Tortillas (corn, flour, or you could even do a lettuce wrap to cut down on carbs) Taco Seasoning (This is an essential in my camp box along with salt, pepper, and hot sauce) Cooking oil Easy Camp Tacos Cooking Directions: Season your ground meat with the taco seasoning. Then, add a little cooking oil to your steel pot and cook the ground meat until it’s browned. Chop your onion and peppers and sauté in the frying pan. After sautéing the veggies and browning the ground beef, tossed everything in the pot. Use the frying pan to warm your tortillas (optional step, but who likes a cold tortilla?) In a warm tortilla, place a scoop of ground meat & veggies, and garnish with lettuce, tomatoes, and guacamole. Boom! Dinner is served. Now, get out there and make some food in the woods. You’ll thank me later. ABOUT GRAFTON I'm a #raddad, bicycle mechanic, photographer and lover of everything the Western US has to offer. You can find me on two wheels, skiing, or knee deep wading in the river. My hands are always greasy and I'll do whatever it takes to keep on playing in the dirt.
EXPLORE RECIPES
Stanleys in the Wild — the White Desert Team
Stanleys in the Wild — the White Desert Team
It’s no secret that Stanley gear is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our new series Stanleys in the Wild tells the stories of your indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen. This time around we’re heading down to the end of the earth with the crew at White Desert—a unique tour operator which takes people right into the heart of Antarctica. Dealing with temperatures as low as -25°C, it’s safe to say this lot know the importance of a good hot drink, and they regularly rely on our gear during their treks onto the planet’s least-populated continent.   To find out more about life (and beverages) in Antarctica, we talked to White Desert’s very own Mindy Roberts…   I know the White Desert team uses a lot of Stanley gear for expeditions. What bits do you use?  The Stanley Classic Legendary Bottles, Travel Mugs and Food Jars are our most reliable gear for keeping drinks and food warm whilst in below zero temperatures. When exploring Antarctica, which is the coldest, driest and windiest continent, it’s very easy to spend hours exploring the landscape. Stanley ensures our guests and guides have easy access to warm soup, hot coffee or cold water to rehydrate in the great outdoors or when relaxing in their pods.  How important is it to have good quality, functional kit when you’re somewhere like Antarctica?   Once you are in an area as remote as Antarctica, your equipment becomes critical to your comfort, survival and ability to perform certain activities. The quality of equipment is not to be underestimated, it’s critical. What’s the reality of life in Antarctica? What’s a normal day like down there in winter? We only operate in the Antarctic summer. This is from mid November to early February each season. At this time of the year it’s 24 hours of daylight which can take some getting used to! During winter in Antarctica there is constant darkness and temperatures can easily plummet to -50°C. Typically, the only humans who overwinter are scientists who reside at their national research bases.  During our season, guests can experience days with crystal clear blue skies, brilliant sunshine and ‘mild’ temperatures of around -5°C-10°C, which is surprisingly temperate for the Queen Maud Land region. However, the weather can change rapidly, bringing high winds, white-out conditions and stormy skies. Antarctica is an unpredictable wilderness—a place of unimaginable beauty and dramatic extremes. And whilst we’ve taken the hardship out of exploring, it’s still the most remote continent on Earth!   How cold can it actually get there? I can sort of get my head around the numbers, but what do temperatures as low as -30 celsius actually feel like?   We don’t normally have such low temperatures around our camps. This level of cold would be felt at the South Pole where we spend around 1-2 hours only. Stepping into temperatures of -25°C or lower is an assault on one’s senses – the bracing air infiltrates your lungs with an intensity like no other feeling. Couple those temperatures with the wind-chill factor and the effects are literally mind (and body) numbing.   What else do you have to contend with down there? How does hiking in Antarctica differ from hiking in Britain for example? Hiking in Antarctica can be anything from a gentle walk to a nearby nunatak or an extreme adventure that cannot be experienced anywhere else on the planet. Spires of rock jutting out of the Earth kilometres high, surrounded by vast white sheets of glacial ice, make you feel like you’re on another planet.  Traversing the terrain here can encompass anything from rope-walks via ferrata; crossing an ancient glacier by foot; abseiling; ice-climbing to rock-climbing a mountain peak with our award-winning High Mountain guides. There is so much to do that you’ll never get bored and everyday you’ll pinch yourself and think, “I’m actually in Antarctica”.   This might be a bit of a naive question, but what’s the situation with people in Antarctica? Can anyone go there?  Antarctica has no indigenous population or permanent residents. There are a small group of scientists and researchers who spend long periods on the continent throughout the year, dedicating their studies to vital climate change studies for National Antarctic Programmes. There is no single country that owns Antarctica. Instead, Antarctica is governed by a group of nations in a unique international partnership.  The Antarctic Treaty, first signed on December 1, 1959, designates Antarctica as a continent devoted to peace and science. There are also very few tourism operations given the difficulty of operating on this vast uninhabited Continent.  We are the only luxury operator in the interior of Antarctica and our hope is to create Antarctic Ambassadors from our client base, not only for the good of the Continent but also of the planet. Our clients are in positions to affect change and influence policy and an Antarctic trip is truly transformative.   It sounds it. Last question to round this off… what’s your favourite hot drink for an Antarctic expedition?  You can’t beat a classic hot chocolate to warm your insides while enjoying the bracing environment on ice. For some, this can be laced with a dram of Lagavulin, Amarula or any vice of choice!   Find out more about White Desert here.
Stanleys In the Wild — Willem and Steffi’s Stanley
Stanleys In the Wild — Willem and Steffi’s Stanley
It’s no secret that Stanley is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our new series ‘Stanleys in the Wild’ tells the stories of your indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen.  To start things off, we’re taking a trip to the Arctic with dog-sledders Willem and Steffi. Since 2014 these two and their team of Alaskan huskies have been trekking across the lower Arctic—with their faithful Stanley bottle in tow. Keen to find out more, we talked to them about hot drinks, cold weather and their love for this unique mode of transport…  How long have you had your Stanley Classic Legendary Bottle? I don´t know for sure—I think it might be around 12 years. The Stanley has been part of our equipment since our early days of adventure. Before dogsledding we were into mountaineering and hiking all over Scandinavia and Stanley was always with us.  We imagine it comes in pretty handy up there. What do you use it for?  Mainly for hot water and coffee. We are both totally coffee addicted and like to take a break on the trail, watch the dogs eating snacks and cooling down while having a good hot coffee.  The Stanley is by far the best choice for us when it comes to isolation for hours in arctic climate, but it's also great for preparing hot water and carrying it outdoors. That way, we can be faster when it comes to preparing food for us humans. And being faster with eating means having more time for dog care which is super important when having a race or expedition. As well as your Stanley flask, what else do you pack for a dog-sled trip?  A lot. The sled bag can easily weigh around 40 kg. First there’s the obligatory outdoor equipment like GPS, power banks, an axe, a map, sleeping bag, emergency signal, duct tape, snow shovel, first aid kit. And then there are the spare parts for the sled, like ropes and gliders.   Our racing sled has a built-in tent which also weighs a bit and of course there is also always a lot of food around. Of course the goal is to travel light, but with a pack of up to 14 dogs, that's not always easy.  That makes sense. How important is good quality equipment during an expedition?  Essential. It doesn’t matter if you are out in heavy conditions or enjoying a great day with sunshine, good and reliable equipment is the key to success. I often compare it to insurance, which you don't have to think about until you are in a bad situation. Good quality equipment means you can focus on the experience and the adventure.  Going back, how did you both get into doing dog-sled expeditions in the first place?  Steffi and I got into dog-sledding around 2014. We had a sabbatical and travelled through north-eastern Europe—and at some point we found the opportunity to live and work on a small husky farm in northern Norway.   Our plan was to stay there for a month and then move on to Sweden, but from the moment we arrived at the farm we were hooked. There was the smell of a husky farm, the barking, all the dog’s faces and the excitement in their eyes… and then our host arrived some minutes later with all these winter clothes on, dressed like people I only knew about from my Jack London stories when I was a kid. That was the exact moment we both got into dog-sledding.   What’s special about dog-sleds? What sets them apart when compared to other ways to travel?  First there are the dogs—Alaskan huskies are bred to be super friendly to every dog or human, great runners and super reliable. But besides these ‘hard-skills’, when you take good care of them, they will accept you as a part of their pack and will interact with you as if you are one of them. And that of course is special.  Then there is the sled itself: Every dogsled is made by hand from skilled craftsmen and the techniques are still the same as they were 100 or more years ago. Expedition sleds are still made out of wood and the pieces are attached to each other with rope.   It's the combination of skill, trust and adventure. Dogsledding is a very calm and quiet way of travelling but at the same time it's a way of travelling where you are always totally exposed to nature. When you understand the dogs way of living and how they see the world, then it´s a magical experience. I once heard a saying in a video where a dog-musher said, "dogsledding lives at the intersection of skill and chaos," and that sums it up.  What sort of challenges can you expect to face whilst out in the arctic? It doesn’t exactly look like a walk in the park.  There are multiple things that might happen. One that always happens are snowstorms—you will face a storm when you are out. Then of course there are things like whiteouts where you don't see anything but white snow, and then a special arctic phenomenon is the "overvann"—which means water that is above frozen lakes or rivers and can push the thick layer of ice down. When facing overvann it is possible to stand in knee-deep water while there still is a thick layer of ice that holds the weight… a strange feeling.   When we’re outside with our own teams, temperature is a crucial factor—when the temperature drops below -25 degrees Celsius and there is a storm, freezing fingers, noses or cheeks are something to think about.  What’s your living situation like when you’re on an expedition?   It's just us and the dogs living outside. When we are lucky and find the mountain huts, we can set up a proper camp with long-lines and straw for the dogs, putting warm coats around them. But the days are of course filled up with work which means getting up early, searching and chopping wood, making dinner for the dogs, melting snow or digging for water under the snow. Then it’s late evenings and working on equipment or planning the next route.  Where do you sleep?   We always have a tent with us. You can either sleep in the tent which is built into the sled bag, take a jervenduk (which is something like a bivouac) and sleep outside, or of course use some of the old gamme—which are cabins for hunters. If possible we try to take routes that are near to mountain cabins so we can sleep inside.  That sounds like a good idea. What sort of stuff do you eat when you’re out?   Expedition meals are normally ready-made meals which are heated up with hot water but sometimes we like to take fresh stuff mixed with pemmican.  What’s that?  Pemmican is a mixture of dried meat, fat and spices. It's very durable and can easily be carried in vacuum bags. It was first made by the Cree people and is a source for high amounts of protein and, even more importantly, fat.   Sounds tasty. Your travels have taken you all over the Arctic—do you have a favourite memory from your expeditions?  The lower arctic region of north-eastern Finnmark is a very special place, with the whales down at the fjord, the reindeers and eagles up in the fjell. The feeling of being in an untouched landscape and the indigenous Sami people around, the northern light and the community of mushers is very special.  The best memory is just a feeling: the feeling when we have planned for months for an expedition and then we finally pull the security rope and head out of the basecamp to explore. This moment is maybe the best moment in my life—it's a moment where you know that you made the right decisions to make a dream, an expedition or a race come true and a moment of total freedom where everything can happen.  Wrapping things up, what’s your favourite hot drink when you’re out in the Arctic?   Of course a good coffee is always great, but I would also take a glögg in the evening and enjoy it outside while watching the dogs and the Northern Lights.  Find out more about Willem and Steffi’s adventures here. Have you also got a Stanley with a story to tell? We’d love to hear from you. Share your story here and bag yourself £100 to spend on our website.
Stanleys In the Wild — Henrik’s Stanley
Stanleys In the Wild — Henrik’s Stanley
It’s no secret that Stanley is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our series ‘Stanleys in the Wild’ tells the stories of your near-indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen.  This time around, we’re pitching a tent in the Danish wilderness with all-round man of the outdoors Henrik Lindgaard and his enviable collection of Stanley  You’ve got some amazing Stanley camping kit. Can you run us through your collection?   I’ve got an old travel mug, the old version of the Stanley Classic Easy Wide Mouth Flask and my Stanley Adventure Stainless Steel cook set. I got my camp cook set as a Christmas present about six or seven years ago. I use it for cooking when I'm out camping alone, or to make sauce in it when there are more people out. I also use it for boiling water for hot cocoa in winter time or to make some cowboy coffee.   What do you mean by cowboy coffee?  That’s where you make coffee without a filter.  Tasty. What else do you usually pack for a camping trip?   It’s very different. It all depends on which kind of trip I am going on—whether that’s a canoe trip, hot tent camping, a hiking trip, a pack raft trip, big tent camping with outdoor cooking or a road trip. When I travel with a backpack I always try to keep the weight down—I’ve been doing this for a long time so I don’t pack things down which I don’t use.  What kind of things do you take on a canoe trip? I imagine there’s not much space for carrying things.   For canoe trips I’ll take a tent or a hammock, things for outdoor cooking, my sleeping gear and a cold beer.  When did you get into camping?   I was a boy scout for over ten years when I was younger, and then when my son was five, he was allowed to become a boy scout (even though you have to be six years old to start). In summer time there was a big scout camp where scouts from other countries came—I borrowed a tent from a friend and we slept in it for five days. And that’s when my adult outdoor life started.  What’s the score with camping in Denmark—can you camp anywhere?   No—not anywhere but we have something called free tenting—where you can camp in 275 forests without asking.  Where do you like to go?   I use the free tenting forests and I know people who own forests so I got permission to camp there.  You cook some pretty elaborate meals outdoors—have you got any tips for cooking away from the kitchen?   Start with what you got in your refrigerator at home—some of the things I always have in mine  are onions, carrots, spring onions, leeks, green peppers, sausages and a bit of butter—throw it on a pan over the fire and it will taste fantastic… or grab a can of cod roe and throw that on a pan.  I love cooking one pot pasta or a simmer pot—just something with some meat in it—if I have two or three hours in the morning then I love making slow campfire bacon. Food tastes better out in the nature.  What else do you like to do whilst out camping?   When I am camping with others, we always have small projects and we’ll spend a lot of time collecting firewood. And then when I am out alone I love to do a bit of carving. I’ve used an axe my whole life, and never had an accident with it yet.  Even with luxurious homes, people still love camping—what is it about sleeping out in the wilderness that’s so special?   It’s the fresh air…I think it has something to do with living a little more simply, at least for a while when camping. In these times we always have something to do or something we have to achieve or things we need to remember to do. My kind of camping is about slowing down and remembering to enjoy the small things.  Do you have a favourite memory from your camping trips?   I have so many… summer tent camping with the family in Sweden or solo hot tent camping in a snowstorm.  Sounds good. Wrapping this up, what’s your favourite hot drink to sip from your Stanley when you’re camping?  Coffee.  Find out more about Henrik’s camping adventures here.  Have you also got a Stanley with a story to tell? We’d love to hear from you. Share your story here and bag yourself £100 to spend on our website.
Flip your thirst with the newest Stanley hydration collection
Flip your thirst with the newest Stanley hydration collection
    Your thirst has met its match. Inspired by your adventures, Stanley introduces for the first time since 1913 a brand NEW product range: water bottles. Fresh styles, but true to Stanley. The quality, durability and lifetime warranty that you are used from Stanley for HOT drinks is now also available for COLD drinks. Available in a range of nature-inspired colors with contrasting lids. Made for serious hydration, Stanley’s new vacuum-insulated collection of Water Bottles (pictured above) is ideal for workouts, dog walks, car camping, beach days, road trips, job sites, or the backyard hammock. QUICK FLIP FOR THE PERFECT FLOW Just push the button and taste the difference. The Stanley Go Quick Flip Water Bottle with push-button fits in most cup holders and is the perfect companion for your urban and outdoor adventures. Especially designed with a steel latch that holds the top extra tight, so it can be safely packed in any bag without a worry. The larger mouth opening gives you that perfect water flow speed that you need and the two-stage lid allows for easy cleaning in the dishwasher and adding ice. Manufactured using 18/8 stainless steel, this bottle can take a beating and is BPA free - so your drink stays safe to consume. Choose from a full array of colors and sizes so your drink always matches your taste while it keeps your cold drinks cold up to 18 hours, 2 days iced.  YOU’LL FLIP FOR THE FLIP STRAW Love drinking from a straw? Whether you need eyes up and a hand on the wheel or you just need to stay in motion, the Stanley Go Flip Straw Water Bottle has your name on it. This Water Bottle features a leakproof lid and a built-in straw. Flip it up for easy sipping on-the-go. When you’re done, snap it shut. Now you’re ready to toss your gear into your bag or backpack. No leaks, no worries. The double-wall vacuum insulation can keep cold drinks cold for up to 12 hours and iced for up to 48 hours. Choose from a full array of colors and sizes so your drink always suits your taste. THOUGHTFULLY DESIGNED, INSIDE AND OUT At the heart of the new Water Bottle Collection is rugged, 18/8 stainless steel for a lifetime of adventures. And with Stanley’s legendary, double-wall vacuum insulation, your water will stay fresh and cold for hours. Or iced for days. All our Stanley water bottles are designed to clean easily. All water bottles are dishwasher safe. Along with a leakproof locking lid, there’s an easy-grip handle for grab-and-go hydration. When it’s time to pack up, the handle rotates to fold flat.   Check out the complete, thirst-quenching lineup: Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (0.47L / 16OZ) Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (0.70L / 24OZ) Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (1.06L / 36OZ) Stanley Flip Straw Water Bottle (0.65L / 22OZ) WHY HYDRATION MATTERS Drinking water is about more than quenching your thirst. Lack of hydration can affect your body temperature, exercise performance, quality of sleep, and overall health. A few easy ways to stay hydrated: make sure you always have water with you; hydrate before, during, and after your workouts; and track your water consumption. Learn more in the Guide to Staying Hydrated During Outdoor Activities.
Old Stanley VS New Stanley: What’s Really Changed In The Unbreakable Bottle?
Old Stanley VS New Stanley: What’s Really Changed In The Unbreakable Bottle?
The Stanley brand has been in the business a long time. Over a hundred years, to be exact. It was 1913 when William Stanley invented the all-steel, double-wall vacuum bottle and stuck his name on it. Rumor has it, that he wanted his coffee hot all day while he was working, and was inspired to apply some of his theories learned while developing transformers. As it turns out, necessity really is the mother of invention. Since then, the Stanley name has become synonymous for ultra-durable, super reliable products made with an eye for sleek design and real life uses. Generations of people have come to rely on their Stanley bottles, mugs, lunchboxes, cook sets, flasks, growlers, coolers, and more every single day, knowing that they’ll keep their food and drink at temperature longer, all while standing up to life’s wear and tear. Today, Stanley’s Built For Life™ promise means that your grandad’s thermos that supported pilots in World War II could very well get set beside that brand new Classic Vacuum Insulated Bottle you picked up for your weekend camping trip. At first glance, you might be hard-pressed to notice a difference: Same tough construction, same classic look, same Stanley hammertone green finish, although once you pick them up, you’ll be able to tell which is which. So when you’ve been the gold standard for “Unbreakable” for literally generations, one question keeps coming up from our customers who have seen the way Stanley bottles seem to last and last: What’s changed over the years? The answer? Everything and nothing. The Beginning To start out, you have to understand what makes a Stanley a Stanley. When William Stanley invented double-wall steel vacuum insulation all the way back in 1913, he set the fundamental groundwork for the technology that would define the company’s reputation for unparalleled performance. At the time vacuum insulated bottles were lined with glass, and they did a fine job keeping coffee hot. That is until one of those got damaged. Glass in your cup of Joe may ruin your day, but in 1913, the equivalent of having to fork out $150-$200 for a new bottle could ruin your entire month or more. This is where Stanley really came to save the day — with value and durability. One of Stanley’s key innovations was Char-Vac™, where charcoal dust was packed between two stainless steel walls while the vacuum insulation was created. This method made the bottles tougher and more resilient, albeit heavier and bulkier. Stanleys from the time of Char-Vac™ were much coveted and are still in use to this day, with some Stanley fanatics still obsessed with the decades old bottles they bought as teenagers. Stanley discontinued use of Char-Vac™ in 2009, opting instead to thicken the outer steel wall. This resulted in a bottle that was significantly lighter weight and built to the same industry- leading specs. But if we’re keeping it real, then we have to say that the old bottles were built to handle some damn good abuse. A level of tough that our newer Classic Series bottles can’t always compete with. This is why we introduced the Master Series in 2017. It’s designed for the people who need the over-the-top durability of the previous Char-Vac™ model and, the new Quad-Vac™ technology means it’ll keep your drinks hot for days. Other innovations were implemented over the years as we constantly tweaked our formula. Bottle necks were widened for easier filling and cleaning. We switched up the kind of stainless steel we use to make our bottles far more resistant to corrosion. We found ways to reduce body welds, reduce the number of potential fail points. Old Vs. New: Which Bottle Is Better? All of these little changes were and are part of the same obsessive hunt for perfection we’ve had from the beginning. William Stanley invented something amazing all the way back in 1913- and we’ve continued to improve on what made our bottles great to begin with, thermal insulation and unprecedented durability. The Quad-Vac™ technology used in the Master Series collection is unrivaled in a marketplace of look-a-likes. The conversation of which bottle is better - the new Stanley bottle or the old Stanley bottle - is always coming up. The truth: neither is better than the other, because they’re both Stanleys. The new bottles are part of a constant evolution, of never being satisfied. Like every great inventor the pursuit of perfection never stops. The Stanley name is more than a single product or process, it’s a promise to the people who have come to rely on us for years: we make bottles that last a lifetime. That’s why, whether it's a Stanley you bought in 1965 or one you picked up just yesterday, we will always honor our lifetime warranty to make sure that every product is as reliable and durable as the day you bought it. Have you had a life changing experience with your trusty Stanley bottle? Let us know! You can tag us on your favorite social media platform or just shoot an email to info@stanley-pmi.com!   ABOUT STANLEY The Stanley brand has a rich 100+ year history. Born from inventor William Stanley Jr. who forever changed the way hot drinks were consumed, in 1913 he fused vacuum insulation and the strength of steel in one portable bottle, inventing the all-steel vacuum bottle we know and love today.
Stanley Classic Legendary Bottle
Stories Of The Unbreakables: The People That Define #BUILTFORLIFE
Since bottle innovator William Stanley introduced the first all steel vacuum bottle in 1913, the name Stanley has come to mean a trusted and reliable friend to generations. Whether it's the thermos that your granddad got for his 15th birthday that he still uses to this day, or the Trigger Action Mug you picked up for a long weekend camping trip, our bottles are made for life and for a lifetime. And when we say a #BUILTFORLIFE it truly is: we’ve got a Stanley vacuum bottle at our HQ that was run over by a truck decades ago and still has coffee in it. Not a single leak. When you get to be 100 years old and you make bottles as tough and beloved as ours, you hear some fantastic stories about how people use our products. It’s more than just having an old bottle kicking around that you break out for a sip now and then, it’s a way of a life. And to the people who cherish our bottles like a member of the family, the essence of #BUILTFORLIFE is about adventure, fun, and pushing things to the limit. These are the stories that define #BUILTFORLIFE, gathered straight from 100 years of real history from real customers. These are the story of the Unbreakables. 13,435ft - Hot Coffee At Low’s Peak, Mount Kinabalu “It was 1.30AM, the temperature had been near freezing for most of the night. I put on my jacket and long johns, headed out to the camp pantry with my Stanley outdoor vacuum bottle. Honestly it was the first time I’ve ever tried using it. “I poured in a few packets of coffee and sugar, added boiling water, locked it up tight and placed it in my bag and got ready for the hike to the summit at 2.30AM. By the time we were on the mountain, pretty much everything I froze. The warm water I brought in a separate - non Stanley bottle - was ice cold halfway up, so I had doubts as to whether my Stanley bottle filled with the hot coffee I made earlier could withstand what the mountain had to offer. My team reached the summit at approximately 6:00AM, by that time the sun was almost up and the temperature was at freezing point. We snapped a few pictures, and I finally took out my Stanley bottle, shared a cup with my buddy and I dare say the coffee was still boiling hot. Instant coffee never tasted as good as it did 13,435ft up in the sky. My Stanley bottle has proven its worth, no doubt.” -Mohamad Adam Bin Mohamad Yakob Like A Phoenix From The Ashes “My mother bought me my Stanley thermos in 1979 when I joined the plumbing trade. I was working in Maryland years ago and the hotel I was staying at had a freak gas explosion and burnt down to the ground. I was not there at the time, but all my belongings were. I lost everything I had on me there. After the fire was put out and the rubble sifted through, the only thing left standing, basically untouched? My Stanley thermos. “I’ve used that thermos every day since then. It’s not green anymore and has quite a few dents, but still keeps my coffee piping hot all day, every day. I use it at work and when I am hunting or fishing. It is very seldom not with me. It joined the workforce with me and it is going to retire with me!” -Greg Gillard A 1600 Foot Bounce “In 1978, I worked in an underground mine. While waiting to go down to working level, my Stanley was knocked from my hand and rolled into the shaft. I wrote it off, but later that day when checking the sump pumps, I found it floating in the sump. It was banged up from falling 1600 feet and the cup was missing, but otherwise completely solid. I’m still using the same thermos to this day!” -Monte L. Generation To Generation “As a young boy, I can remember with warm feelings my father getting up early in the morning much before dawn. Sometimes I would get up and see the Stanley sitting on the counter next to my father’s huge lunch box. I can remember dad mentioning that there was only one thermos worth packing into the woods - Stanley. He used to say that there was nothing worse than lukewarm coffee. I could remember thinking that one day I would grow up and proudly pack my Stanley into the woods. I soon grew up and went off to college. During the summers I worked in woods. I bought my first Stanley that first summer and proudly carried it off to the woods. When you had a Stanley it was a status symbol. “Now 35 year later, my own son has gone off to college and is working construction during the summer. I get up each morning at 5AM and pack his lunch and fill his first Stanley. He said that it is an amazing thermos. He too proudly carries it onto the job site. My grandfather, my father, myself and now my son all packed Stanley thermoses. From generation to generation, Stanley thermoses remain a family institution. Someday, my grandchildren will pack a Stanley.” -Dennis H. A Badge Of Honor, A Bullet Graze “My Stanley classic bottle has endured 10 years of extreme abuse across the US, Mexico, Central America, Chile, and Peru. While it is now officially the ugliest thermal bottle on the planet, it works like the day it was purchased. Its badge of honor is a bullet graze obtained on a construction site in Guatemala during a robbery attempt. I plan to be buried with Stanley.” -Dave Moreno Stanley Vs. An 18 Wheeler “This is short and sweet: My husband unknowingly dropped his thermos under his truck. He then rolled over it with all 18 wheels, loaded at 80,000 lbs. When he noticed it was gone, he backed up to find it - rolling over it again! “When he got out of the truck, he pulled out the thermos - which only had minor scratches on it! He poured out steaming hot coffee that had been there for at least 8 hours.” -Anonymous Have you had a life changing experience with your trusty Stanley bottle? Let us know! You can tag us on your favorite social media platform or just shoot an email to info@stanley-pmi.com! ABOUT STANLEY The Stanley brand has a rich 100+ year history. Born from inventor William Stanley Jr. who forever changed the way hot drinks were consumed, in 1913 he fused vacuum insulation and the strength of steel in one portable bottle, inventing the all-steel vacuum bottle we know and love today.
Stanleys in the Wild — the White Desert Team
Stanleys in the Wild — the White Desert Team
It’s no secret that Stanley gear is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our new series Stanleys in the Wild tells the stories of your indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen. This time around we’re heading down to the end of the earth with the crew at White Desert—a unique tour operator which takes people right into the heart of Antarctica. Dealing with temperatures as low as -25°C, it’s safe to say this lot know the importance of a good hot drink, and they regularly rely on our gear during their treks onto the planet’s least-populated continent.   To find out more about life (and beverages) in Antarctica, we talked to White Desert’s very own Mindy Roberts…   I know the White Desert team uses a lot of Stanley gear for expeditions. What bits do you use?  The Stanley Classic Legendary Bottles, Travel Mugs and Food Jars are our most reliable gear for keeping drinks and food warm whilst in below zero temperatures. When exploring Antarctica, which is the coldest, driest and windiest continent, it’s very easy to spend hours exploring the landscape. Stanley ensures our guests and guides have easy access to warm soup, hot coffee or cold water to rehydrate in the great outdoors or when relaxing in their pods.  How important is it to have good quality, functional kit when you’re somewhere like Antarctica?   Once you are in an area as remote as Antarctica, your equipment becomes critical to your comfort, survival and ability to perform certain activities. The quality of equipment is not to be underestimated, it’s critical. What’s the reality of life in Antarctica? What’s a normal day like down there in winter? We only operate in the Antarctic summer. This is from mid November to early February each season. At this time of the year it’s 24 hours of daylight which can take some getting used to! During winter in Antarctica there is constant darkness and temperatures can easily plummet to -50°C. Typically, the only humans who overwinter are scientists who reside at their national research bases.  During our season, guests can experience days with crystal clear blue skies, brilliant sunshine and ‘mild’ temperatures of around -5°C-10°C, which is surprisingly temperate for the Queen Maud Land region. However, the weather can change rapidly, bringing high winds, white-out conditions and stormy skies. Antarctica is an unpredictable wilderness—a place of unimaginable beauty and dramatic extremes. And whilst we’ve taken the hardship out of exploring, it’s still the most remote continent on Earth!   How cold can it actually get there? I can sort of get my head around the numbers, but what do temperatures as low as -30 celsius actually feel like?   We don’t normally have such low temperatures around our camps. This level of cold would be felt at the South Pole where we spend around 1-2 hours only. Stepping into temperatures of -25°C or lower is an assault on one’s senses – the bracing air infiltrates your lungs with an intensity like no other feeling. Couple those temperatures with the wind-chill factor and the effects are literally mind (and body) numbing.   What else do you have to contend with down there? How does hiking in Antarctica differ from hiking in Britain for example? Hiking in Antarctica can be anything from a gentle walk to a nearby nunatak or an extreme adventure that cannot be experienced anywhere else on the planet. Spires of rock jutting out of the Earth kilometres high, surrounded by vast white sheets of glacial ice, make you feel like you’re on another planet.  Traversing the terrain here can encompass anything from rope-walks via ferrata; crossing an ancient glacier by foot; abseiling; ice-climbing to rock-climbing a mountain peak with our award-winning High Mountain guides. There is so much to do that you’ll never get bored and everyday you’ll pinch yourself and think, “I’m actually in Antarctica”.   This might be a bit of a naive question, but what’s the situation with people in Antarctica? Can anyone go there?  Antarctica has no indigenous population or permanent residents. There are a small group of scientists and researchers who spend long periods on the continent throughout the year, dedicating their studies to vital climate change studies for National Antarctic Programmes. There is no single country that owns Antarctica. Instead, Antarctica is governed by a group of nations in a unique international partnership.  The Antarctic Treaty, first signed on December 1, 1959, designates Antarctica as a continent devoted to peace and science. There are also very few tourism operations given the difficulty of operating on this vast uninhabited Continent.  We are the only luxury operator in the interior of Antarctica and our hope is to create Antarctic Ambassadors from our client base, not only for the good of the Continent but also of the planet. Our clients are in positions to affect change and influence policy and an Antarctic trip is truly transformative.   It sounds it. Last question to round this off… what’s your favourite hot drink for an Antarctic expedition?  You can’t beat a classic hot chocolate to warm your insides while enjoying the bracing environment on ice. For some, this can be laced with a dram of Lagavulin, Amarula or any vice of choice!   Find out more about White Desert here.
Stanleys In the Wild — Willem and Steffi’s Stanley
Stanleys In the Wild — Willem and Steffi’s Stanley
It’s no secret that Stanley is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our new series ‘Stanleys in the Wild’ tells the stories of your indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen.  To start things off, we’re taking a trip to the Arctic with dog-sledders Willem and Steffi. Since 2014 these two and their team of Alaskan huskies have been trekking across the lower Arctic—with their faithful Stanley bottle in tow. Keen to find out more, we talked to them about hot drinks, cold weather and their love for this unique mode of transport…  How long have you had your Stanley Classic Legendary Bottle? I don´t know for sure—I think it might be around 12 years. The Stanley has been part of our equipment since our early days of adventure. Before dogsledding we were into mountaineering and hiking all over Scandinavia and Stanley was always with us.  We imagine it comes in pretty handy up there. What do you use it for?  Mainly for hot water and coffee. We are both totally coffee addicted and like to take a break on the trail, watch the dogs eating snacks and cooling down while having a good hot coffee.  The Stanley is by far the best choice for us when it comes to isolation for hours in arctic climate, but it's also great for preparing hot water and carrying it outdoors. That way, we can be faster when it comes to preparing food for us humans. And being faster with eating means having more time for dog care which is super important when having a race or expedition. As well as your Stanley flask, what else do you pack for a dog-sled trip?  A lot. The sled bag can easily weigh around 40 kg. First there’s the obligatory outdoor equipment like GPS, power banks, an axe, a map, sleeping bag, emergency signal, duct tape, snow shovel, first aid kit. And then there are the spare parts for the sled, like ropes and gliders.   Our racing sled has a built-in tent which also weighs a bit and of course there is also always a lot of food around. Of course the goal is to travel light, but with a pack of up to 14 dogs, that's not always easy.  That makes sense. How important is good quality equipment during an expedition?  Essential. It doesn’t matter if you are out in heavy conditions or enjoying a great day with sunshine, good and reliable equipment is the key to success. I often compare it to insurance, which you don't have to think about until you are in a bad situation. Good quality equipment means you can focus on the experience and the adventure.  Going back, how did you both get into doing dog-sled expeditions in the first place?  Steffi and I got into dog-sledding around 2014. We had a sabbatical and travelled through north-eastern Europe—and at some point we found the opportunity to live and work on a small husky farm in northern Norway.   Our plan was to stay there for a month and then move on to Sweden, but from the moment we arrived at the farm we were hooked. There was the smell of a husky farm, the barking, all the dog’s faces and the excitement in their eyes… and then our host arrived some minutes later with all these winter clothes on, dressed like people I only knew about from my Jack London stories when I was a kid. That was the exact moment we both got into dog-sledding.   What’s special about dog-sleds? What sets them apart when compared to other ways to travel?  First there are the dogs—Alaskan huskies are bred to be super friendly to every dog or human, great runners and super reliable. But besides these ‘hard-skills’, when you take good care of them, they will accept you as a part of their pack and will interact with you as if you are one of them. And that of course is special.  Then there is the sled itself: Every dogsled is made by hand from skilled craftsmen and the techniques are still the same as they were 100 or more years ago. Expedition sleds are still made out of wood and the pieces are attached to each other with rope.   It's the combination of skill, trust and adventure. Dogsledding is a very calm and quiet way of travelling but at the same time it's a way of travelling where you are always totally exposed to nature. When you understand the dogs way of living and how they see the world, then it´s a magical experience. I once heard a saying in a video where a dog-musher said, "dogsledding lives at the intersection of skill and chaos," and that sums it up.  What sort of challenges can you expect to face whilst out in the arctic? It doesn’t exactly look like a walk in the park.  There are multiple things that might happen. One that always happens are snowstorms—you will face a storm when you are out. Then of course there are things like whiteouts where you don't see anything but white snow, and then a special arctic phenomenon is the "overvann"—which means water that is above frozen lakes or rivers and can push the thick layer of ice down. When facing overvann it is possible to stand in knee-deep water while there still is a thick layer of ice that holds the weight… a strange feeling.   When we’re outside with our own teams, temperature is a crucial factor—when the temperature drops below -25 degrees Celsius and there is a storm, freezing fingers, noses or cheeks are something to think about.  What’s your living situation like when you’re on an expedition?   It's just us and the dogs living outside. When we are lucky and find the mountain huts, we can set up a proper camp with long-lines and straw for the dogs, putting warm coats around them. But the days are of course filled up with work which means getting up early, searching and chopping wood, making dinner for the dogs, melting snow or digging for water under the snow. Then it’s late evenings and working on equipment or planning the next route.  Where do you sleep?   We always have a tent with us. You can either sleep in the tent which is built into the sled bag, take a jervenduk (which is something like a bivouac) and sleep outside, or of course use some of the old gamme—which are cabins for hunters. If possible we try to take routes that are near to mountain cabins so we can sleep inside.  That sounds like a good idea. What sort of stuff do you eat when you’re out?   Expedition meals are normally ready-made meals which are heated up with hot water but sometimes we like to take fresh stuff mixed with pemmican.  What’s that?  Pemmican is a mixture of dried meat, fat and spices. It's very durable and can easily be carried in vacuum bags. It was first made by the Cree people and is a source for high amounts of protein and, even more importantly, fat.   Sounds tasty. Your travels have taken you all over the Arctic—do you have a favourite memory from your expeditions?  The lower arctic region of north-eastern Finnmark is a very special place, with the whales down at the fjord, the reindeers and eagles up in the fjell. The feeling of being in an untouched landscape and the indigenous Sami people around, the northern light and the community of mushers is very special.  The best memory is just a feeling: the feeling when we have planned for months for an expedition and then we finally pull the security rope and head out of the basecamp to explore. This moment is maybe the best moment in my life—it's a moment where you know that you made the right decisions to make a dream, an expedition or a race come true and a moment of total freedom where everything can happen.  Wrapping things up, what’s your favourite hot drink when you’re out in the Arctic?   Of course a good coffee is always great, but I would also take a glögg in the evening and enjoy it outside while watching the dogs and the Northern Lights.  Find out more about Willem and Steffi’s adventures here. Have you also got a Stanley with a story to tell? We’d love to hear from you. Share your story here and bag yourself £100 to spend on our website.
Stanleys In the Wild — Henrik’s Stanley
Stanleys In the Wild — Henrik’s Stanley
It’s no secret that Stanley is made to last—and it’s not unheard of to see a Stanley flask still keeping coffee warm 50 years after it rolled out the factory. With that in mind, our series ‘Stanleys in the Wild’ tells the stories of your near-indestructible Stanleys—the places they’ve been and the things they’ve seen.  This time around, we’re pitching a tent in the Danish wilderness with all-round man of the outdoors Henrik Lindgaard and his enviable collection of Stanley  You’ve got some amazing Stanley camping kit. Can you run us through your collection?   I’ve got an old travel mug, the old version of the Stanley Classic Easy Wide Mouth Flask and my Stanley Adventure Stainless Steel cook set. I got my camp cook set as a Christmas present about six or seven years ago. I use it for cooking when I'm out camping alone, or to make sauce in it when there are more people out. I also use it for boiling water for hot cocoa in winter time or to make some cowboy coffee.   What do you mean by cowboy coffee?  That’s where you make coffee without a filter.  Tasty. What else do you usually pack for a camping trip?   It’s very different. It all depends on which kind of trip I am going on—whether that’s a canoe trip, hot tent camping, a hiking trip, a pack raft trip, big tent camping with outdoor cooking or a road trip. When I travel with a backpack I always try to keep the weight down—I’ve been doing this for a long time so I don’t pack things down which I don’t use.  What kind of things do you take on a canoe trip? I imagine there’s not much space for carrying things.   For canoe trips I’ll take a tent or a hammock, things for outdoor cooking, my sleeping gear and a cold beer.  When did you get into camping?   I was a boy scout for over ten years when I was younger, and then when my son was five, he was allowed to become a boy scout (even though you have to be six years old to start). In summer time there was a big scout camp where scouts from other countries came—I borrowed a tent from a friend and we slept in it for five days. And that’s when my adult outdoor life started.  What’s the score with camping in Denmark—can you camp anywhere?   No—not anywhere but we have something called free tenting—where you can camp in 275 forests without asking.  Where do you like to go?   I use the free tenting forests and I know people who own forests so I got permission to camp there.  You cook some pretty elaborate meals outdoors—have you got any tips for cooking away from the kitchen?   Start with what you got in your refrigerator at home—some of the things I always have in mine  are onions, carrots, spring onions, leeks, green peppers, sausages and a bit of butter—throw it on a pan over the fire and it will taste fantastic… or grab a can of cod roe and throw that on a pan.  I love cooking one pot pasta or a simmer pot—just something with some meat in it—if I have two or three hours in the morning then I love making slow campfire bacon. Food tastes better out in the nature.  What else do you like to do whilst out camping?   When I am camping with others, we always have small projects and we’ll spend a lot of time collecting firewood. And then when I am out alone I love to do a bit of carving. I’ve used an axe my whole life, and never had an accident with it yet.  Even with luxurious homes, people still love camping—what is it about sleeping out in the wilderness that’s so special?   It’s the fresh air…I think it has something to do with living a little more simply, at least for a while when camping. In these times we always have something to do or something we have to achieve or things we need to remember to do. My kind of camping is about slowing down and remembering to enjoy the small things.  Do you have a favourite memory from your camping trips?   I have so many… summer tent camping with the family in Sweden or solo hot tent camping in a snowstorm.  Sounds good. Wrapping this up, what’s your favourite hot drink to sip from your Stanley when you’re camping?  Coffee.  Find out more about Henrik’s camping adventures here.  Have you also got a Stanley with a story to tell? We’d love to hear from you. Share your story here and bag yourself £100 to spend on our website.
Flip your thirst with the newest Stanley hydration collection
Flip your thirst with the newest Stanley hydration collection
    Your thirst has met its match. Inspired by your adventures, Stanley introduces for the first time since 1913 a brand NEW product range: water bottles. Fresh styles, but true to Stanley. The quality, durability and lifetime warranty that you are used from Stanley for HOT drinks is now also available for COLD drinks. Available in a range of nature-inspired colors with contrasting lids. Made for serious hydration, Stanley’s new vacuum-insulated collection of Water Bottles (pictured above) is ideal for workouts, dog walks, car camping, beach days, road trips, job sites, or the backyard hammock. QUICK FLIP FOR THE PERFECT FLOW Just push the button and taste the difference. The Stanley Go Quick Flip Water Bottle with push-button fits in most cup holders and is the perfect companion for your urban and outdoor adventures. Especially designed with a steel latch that holds the top extra tight, so it can be safely packed in any bag without a worry. The larger mouth opening gives you that perfect water flow speed that you need and the two-stage lid allows for easy cleaning in the dishwasher and adding ice. Manufactured using 18/8 stainless steel, this bottle can take a beating and is BPA free - so your drink stays safe to consume. Choose from a full array of colors and sizes so your drink always matches your taste while it keeps your cold drinks cold up to 18 hours, 2 days iced.  YOU’LL FLIP FOR THE FLIP STRAW Love drinking from a straw? Whether you need eyes up and a hand on the wheel or you just need to stay in motion, the Stanley Go Flip Straw Water Bottle has your name on it. This Water Bottle features a leakproof lid and a built-in straw. Flip it up for easy sipping on-the-go. When you’re done, snap it shut. Now you’re ready to toss your gear into your bag or backpack. No leaks, no worries. The double-wall vacuum insulation can keep cold drinks cold for up to 12 hours and iced for up to 48 hours. Choose from a full array of colors and sizes so your drink always suits your taste. THOUGHTFULLY DESIGNED, INSIDE AND OUT At the heart of the new Water Bottle Collection is rugged, 18/8 stainless steel for a lifetime of adventures. And with Stanley’s legendary, double-wall vacuum insulation, your water will stay fresh and cold for hours. Or iced for days. All our Stanley water bottles are designed to clean easily. All water bottles are dishwasher safe. Along with a leakproof locking lid, there’s an easy-grip handle for grab-and-go hydration. When it’s time to pack up, the handle rotates to fold flat.   Check out the complete, thirst-quenching lineup: Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (0.47L / 16OZ) Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (0.70L / 24OZ) Stanley Quick Flip Water Bottle (1.06L / 36OZ) Stanley Flip Straw Water Bottle (0.65L / 22OZ) WHY HYDRATION MATTERS Drinking water is about more than quenching your thirst. Lack of hydration can affect your body temperature, exercise performance, quality of sleep, and overall health. A few easy ways to stay hydrated: make sure you always have water with you; hydrate before, during, and after your workouts; and track your water consumption. Learn more in the Guide to Staying Hydrated During Outdoor Activities.
Old Stanley VS New Stanley: What’s Really Changed In The Unbreakable Bottle?
Old Stanley VS New Stanley: What’s Really Changed In The Unbreakable Bottle?
The Stanley brand has been in the business a long time. Over a hundred years, to be exact. It was 1913 when William Stanley invented the all-steel, double-wall vacuum bottle and stuck his name on it. Rumor has it, that he wanted his coffee hot all day while he was working, and was inspired to apply some of his theories learned while developing transformers. As it turns out, necessity really is the mother of invention. Since then, the Stanley name has become synonymous for ultra-durable, super reliable products made with an eye for sleek design and real life uses. Generations of people have come to rely on their Stanley bottles, mugs, lunchboxes, cook sets, flasks, growlers, coolers, and more every single day, knowing that they’ll keep their food and drink at temperature longer, all while standing up to life’s wear and tear. Today, Stanley’s Built For Life™ promise means that your grandad’s thermos that supported pilots in World War II could very well get set beside that brand new Classic Vacuum Insulated Bottle you picked up for your weekend camping trip. At first glance, you might be hard-pressed to notice a difference: Same tough construction, same classic look, same Stanley hammertone green finish, although once you pick them up, you’ll be able to tell which is which. So when you’ve been the gold standard for “Unbreakable” for literally generations, one question keeps coming up from our customers who have seen the way Stanley bottles seem to last and last: What’s changed over the years? The answer? Everything and nothing. The Beginning To start out, you have to understand what makes a Stanley a Stanley. When William Stanley invented double-wall steel vacuum insulation all the way back in 1913, he set the fundamental groundwork for the technology that would define the company’s reputation for unparalleled performance. At the time vacuum insulated bottles were lined with glass, and they did a fine job keeping coffee hot. That is until one of those got damaged. Glass in your cup of Joe may ruin your day, but in 1913, the equivalent of having to fork out $150-$200 for a new bottle could ruin your entire month or more. This is where Stanley really came to save the day — with value and durability. One of Stanley’s key innovations was Char-Vac™, where charcoal dust was packed between two stainless steel walls while the vacuum insulation was created. This method made the bottles tougher and more resilient, albeit heavier and bulkier. Stanleys from the time of Char-Vac™ were much coveted and are still in use to this day, with some Stanley fanatics still obsessed with the decades old bottles they bought as teenagers. Stanley discontinued use of Char-Vac™ in 2009, opting instead to thicken the outer steel wall. This resulted in a bottle that was significantly lighter weight and built to the same industry- leading specs. But if we’re keeping it real, then we have to say that the old bottles were built to handle some damn good abuse. A level of tough that our newer Classic Series bottles can’t always compete with. This is why we introduced the Master Series in 2017. It’s designed for the people who need the over-the-top durability of the previous Char-Vac™ model and, the new Quad-Vac™ technology means it’ll keep your drinks hot for days. Other innovations were implemented over the years as we constantly tweaked our formula. Bottle necks were widened for easier filling and cleaning. We switched up the kind of stainless steel we use to make our bottles far more resistant to corrosion. We found ways to reduce body welds, reduce the number of potential fail points. Old Vs. New: Which Bottle Is Better? All of these little changes were and are part of the same obsessive hunt for perfection we’ve had from the beginning. William Stanley invented something amazing all the way back in 1913- and we’ve continued to improve on what made our bottles great to begin with, thermal insulation and unprecedented durability. The Quad-Vac™ technology used in the Master Series collection is unrivaled in a marketplace of look-a-likes. The conversation of which bottle is better - the new Stanley bottle or the old Stanley bottle - is always coming up. The truth: neither is better than the other, because they’re both Stanleys. The new bottles are part of a constant evolution, of never being satisfied. Like every great inventor the pursuit of perfection never stops. The Stanley name is more than a single product or process, it’s a promise to the people who have come to rely on us for years: we make bottles that last a lifetime. That’s why, whether it's a Stanley you bought in 1965 or one you picked up just yesterday, we will always honor our lifetime warranty to make sure that every product is as reliable and durable as the day you bought it. Have you had a life changing experience with your trusty Stanley bottle? Let us know! You can tag us on your favorite social media platform or just shoot an email to info@stanley-pmi.com!   ABOUT STANLEY The Stanley brand has a rich 100+ year history. Born from inventor William Stanley Jr. who forever changed the way hot drinks were consumed, in 1913 he fused vacuum insulation and the strength of steel in one portable bottle, inventing the all-steel vacuum bottle we know and love today.
Stanley Classic Legendary Bottle
Stories Of The Unbreakables: The People That Define #BUILTFORLIFE
Since bottle innovator William Stanley introduced the first all steel vacuum bottle in 1913, the name Stanley has come to mean a trusted and reliable friend to generations. Whether it's the thermos that your granddad got for his 15th birthday that he still uses to this day, or the Trigger Action Mug you picked up for a long weekend camping trip, our bottles are made for life and for a lifetime. And when we say a #BUILTFORLIFE it truly is: we’ve got a Stanley vacuum bottle at our HQ that was run over by a truck decades ago and still has coffee in it. Not a single leak. When you get to be 100 years old and you make bottles as tough and beloved as ours, you hear some fantastic stories about how people use our products. It’s more than just having an old bottle kicking around that you break out for a sip now and then, it’s a way of a life. And to the people who cherish our bottles like a member of the family, the essence of #BUILTFORLIFE is about adventure, fun, and pushing things to the limit. These are the stories that define #BUILTFORLIFE, gathered straight from 100 years of real history from real customers. These are the story of the Unbreakables. 13,435ft - Hot Coffee At Low’s Peak, Mount Kinabalu “It was 1.30AM, the temperature had been near freezing for most of the night. I put on my jacket and long johns, headed out to the camp pantry with my Stanley outdoor vacuum bottle. Honestly it was the first time I’ve ever tried using it. “I poured in a few packets of coffee and sugar, added boiling water, locked it up tight and placed it in my bag and got ready for the hike to the summit at 2.30AM. By the time we were on the mountain, pretty much everything I froze. The warm water I brought in a separate - non Stanley bottle - was ice cold halfway up, so I had doubts as to whether my Stanley bottle filled with the hot coffee I made earlier could withstand what the mountain had to offer. My team reached the summit at approximately 6:00AM, by that time the sun was almost up and the temperature was at freezing point. We snapped a few pictures, and I finally took out my Stanley bottle, shared a cup with my buddy and I dare say the coffee was still boiling hot. Instant coffee never tasted as good as it did 13,435ft up in the sky. My Stanley bottle has proven its worth, no doubt.” -Mohamad Adam Bin Mohamad Yakob Like A Phoenix From The Ashes “My mother bought me my Stanley thermos in 1979 when I joined the plumbing trade. I was working in Maryland years ago and the hotel I was staying at had a freak gas explosion and burnt down to the ground. I was not there at the time, but all my belongings were. I lost everything I had on me there. After the fire was put out and the rubble sifted through, the only thing left standing, basically untouched? My Stanley thermos. “I’ve used that thermos every day since then. It’s not green anymore and has quite a few dents, but still keeps my coffee piping hot all day, every day. I use it at work and when I am hunting or fishing. It is very seldom not with me. It joined the workforce with me and it is going to retire with me!” -Greg Gillard A 1600 Foot Bounce “In 1978, I worked in an underground mine. While waiting to go down to working level, my Stanley was knocked from my hand and rolled into the shaft. I wrote it off, but later that day when checking the sump pumps, I found it floating in the sump. It was banged up from falling 1600 feet and the cup was missing, but otherwise completely solid. I’m still using the same thermos to this day!” -Monte L. Generation To Generation “As a young boy, I can remember with warm feelings my father getting up early in the morning much before dawn. Sometimes I would get up and see the Stanley sitting on the counter next to my father’s huge lunch box. I can remember dad mentioning that there was only one thermos worth packing into the woods - Stanley. He used to say that there was nothing worse than lukewarm coffee. I could remember thinking that one day I would grow up and proudly pack my Stanley into the woods. I soon grew up and went off to college. During the summers I worked in woods. I bought my first Stanley that first summer and proudly carried it off to the woods. When you had a Stanley it was a status symbol. “Now 35 year later, my own son has gone off to college and is working construction during the summer. I get up each morning at 5AM and pack his lunch and fill his first Stanley. He said that it is an amazing thermos. He too proudly carries it onto the job site. My grandfather, my father, myself and now my son all packed Stanley thermoses. From generation to generation, Stanley thermoses remain a family institution. Someday, my grandchildren will pack a Stanley.” -Dennis H. A Badge Of Honor, A Bullet Graze “My Stanley classic bottle has endured 10 years of extreme abuse across the US, Mexico, Central America, Chile, and Peru. While it is now officially the ugliest thermal bottle on the planet, it works like the day it was purchased. Its badge of honor is a bullet graze obtained on a construction site in Guatemala during a robbery attempt. I plan to be buried with Stanley.” -Dave Moreno Stanley Vs. An 18 Wheeler “This is short and sweet: My husband unknowingly dropped his thermos under his truck. He then rolled over it with all 18 wheels, loaded at 80,000 lbs. When he noticed it was gone, he backed up to find it - rolling over it again! “When he got out of the truck, he pulled out the thermos - which only had minor scratches on it! He poured out steaming hot coffee that had been there for at least 8 hours.” -Anonymous Have you had a life changing experience with your trusty Stanley bottle? Let us know! You can tag us on your favorite social media platform or just shoot an email to info@stanley-pmi.com! ABOUT STANLEY The Stanley brand has a rich 100+ year history. Born from inventor William Stanley Jr. who forever changed the way hot drinks were consumed, in 1913 he fused vacuum insulation and the strength of steel in one portable bottle, inventing the all-steel vacuum bottle we know and love today.
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